posthumorously [sic]: @DebbieLaskeyMBA @jccarcamo @blogging4jobs @DannyBrown @Mark_Harai

February 9, 2012

blog soup 02.10.2012

posthumorously [sic]: super bowl ads, dance cards, and curmudgeon-ing

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

This song is dedicated to all the bloggers out there who just don’t get enough love:

Napoleon XIV, They’re coming to take me away

Read the rest of this entry »


Blog Soup 01.23.2012 Crack that whip! And other social media DOHs

January 23, 2012

blog soup 01.23.2012

Crack that whip! And other social media DOHs.

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

Devo, Whip It!

1. Bloggers On Pedestals Revisited by Jayme Soulati

Jayme Soulati reminds us that it’s not easy being on a pedestal.

Jayme also gives a warm and friendly shout out to her favorite bloggers’ bloggers: Mark Schaefer (@markwschaefer), Gini Dietrich (@ginidietrich), Jay Baer (@jaybear), Danny Brown, (@dannybrown) and Marcus Sheridan (@thesaleslion). Read the rest of this entry »


Blog Soup 2011.11.18 What are you doing online? Why?

November 18, 2011

Blog Soup

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

Blog Soup 2011.11.18 What are you doing online? Why?

What are you doing with your life? What are you doing online? What is your purpose? What is your function? Why?

You don’t know? Have you considered the advice of the Duchess to Alice (Alice of Wonderland)?

Be what you would seem to be — or, if you’d like it put more simply — Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise.

About Blog Soup

I read a lot of blogs. Maybe, too many. I comment on a lot of blog posts. Maybe, too many. If you are a Triberrati, you do too.

A Triberrati is a blogger that stands out in the Triberr community. Triberr is a web app that connects bloggers and helps them to curate each other on Twitter. You can learn all about Triberr by reading any of the following posts about it.

1. Nicole Humphrey CookThe Idiots Guide to Triberr Tutorial

2. Yomar LopezHow Triberr Changes The Competitive Landscape

3. Neicole CrepeauFriday Fives: Tips For Using Triberr

I intend to write pithy, poignant comments that may help you truly rediscover yourself through the blog posts of friends and strangers. In terms of your journey of self discovery, the destinations are not as important as is your own personal negotiation of the questions, answers, and confusions which you may discover by following a link, reading a blog post, poring over comments, and making a comment. On the other hand, this is our community and, yes, community is all about our commitment to the community, conversations, consensus, disagreement, participation, and, yes, to each other.

I will fail often in this endeavor, but I can, as Booker T. Washington said, keep on keeping on. Will you humor me?

Gary Portnoy, Where everybody knows your name (Cheers theme song)

2011.11.18

Caterpillar:

Who are YOU?

Alice:

This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. I — I hardly know, sir, just at present — at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.

Featured

The blog posts that I commented on in this Blog Soup:

1. Don’t Skype your community away by Bill Dorman

2. Stop looking for success and happiness by Craig McBreen

3. Butthead Asking Dumb Questions?! Are You? by Akos Fintor

4. True Inspiration From My Most Popular YouTube Video by Adrienne Smith

5. The Only User Manual That You Will Ever Need by Marcus Baker

6. Why do I do what I do by Janet Callaway

7. Dad Bloggers Get Paid To Blog by Jack Steiner


The Crests, Trouble in Paradise

Blog Soup

My unabashed comments:

1. Don’t Skype your community away by Bill Dorman

Bill Dorman has been wondering what happened to the party. Where did everyone go? Was it the speedos? Or skype? Of course, this is Bill being tongue in cheek and charming.

My comment:

It’s not the Skype, Bill. It’s not the speedos. You’re a stand up guy. You’re likable. You’re sexy. Oops! There’s that word again. 

Everybody wants you at their party. And I’m not teasing you, Bill.

The problems are several. And I know you’ve been waiting for me to sum it up. After all, that’s what I do. I go deep and think it through because I can. [grin] Of course, I can try to dish it out with my own tongue in cheek. But I’ll never do it with your finesse, Bill.

5. High School Prejudice

Some people lack the professional culture to deal with people they don’t like. In other words, they haven’t graduated from high school. So if they see someone they don’t like hanging out at your place, they may stop coming by.

It’s their loss, Bill. I continue to contribute at several watering holes despite the frauds, fucktards, and stupid clowns that frequent the same.

4. Faking it is no fun

Most people just can’t fake it forever. They need to get off. [grin]

Being positive, encouraging, and kindly when your trudging through the bull shit can try anyone’s patience. Some do it day in and out without any hard evidence of tomorrow’s reward and they will pick up their toys and head home – sooner or later.

3. This Ain’t Easy Street

It just doesn’t work. Not you, Bill! Blogging!!! It’s not the game changer they hoped it would be. Because it ain’t easy. It takes work. Not everyone can succeed. And there’s no guarantees for success even for those that show promise. Granted, it takes the average Joe or Jane three to six months to figure that out. 

2. Boot Lickers and Suck Ups

It’s not obvious that you’re in the in crowd. Are you best buddies with 12 B-list bloggers and a minimum of three A-list bloggers?

Do they mention you, give you props, and throw you a link in their blog posts from time to time?

People need a reason to suck up and lick boot.

1. Where’s the Money?

You don’t have a weekly “how to” on how someone can easily move and improve it by an inch.

Bill, they need to pay bills. They have the need to succeed.

You keep doing what you are doing. Lift your allies with you as you level up. Give it three years and you’ll be an online authority. Perhaps, a sensation! Mark my words, Bill.

2. Stop looking for success and happiness by Craig McBreen

Writes Craig McBreen:

Self-help is for suckers.

My comment:

Amen.

Reading the statement, “I rock. I will succeed because I rock hard,” one hundred times will not make you successful. Thinking that statement one hundred times won’t do it. Writing that statement one hundred times won’t do it either. Because that’s not how magic and fairy tales work.

Life is hard.

That’s what James writes here.

Magic comes from killing dragons, demons, and all the things that own you through fear. Fairy tales are the stories of fears faced and conquered, virtues exercised in decision and action, and the triumph of the hero, heroine, or saint.

Don’t just do it. And don’t just do something. Do good, do it often, and do it well.

Awesome post, Craig!

3. Butthead Asking Dumb Questions?! Are You? by Akos Fintor

Ako’s Twitter Bio Statement:

Helping others to break limiting beliefs about success. One belief at a time.

Akos asks you if you are asking the right questions?

What can I learn from this or How can I turn this around?

My comment:

When the fuck does it get easier?

That’s what Frank Dickinson asks via a reposted guest post by @LisaMilesBrady.

It just happens that I have some thoughts to share.

I am personally acquainted with dozens of millionaires and former millionaires. A handful inherited their wealth. Most of them made their wealth by mostly illegal means. Only a handful of these acquaintances made their wealth by strictly legal, honest, good decisions, and hard work. Most of the latter have lost their wealth.

Having spent considerable time and intimate conversation with such persons, I can tell you that their successes had little to do with asking themselves questions, being positive, and doing the right thing. The most common answer, being in the right place at the right time, is a euphemism.

A euphemism is a substitution of an inoffensive term for one considered offensively explicit and scandalous.

Few are driven simply by greed, a will to power, and a want to make the world around them – their empire. Most are fueled by fear, hatred, and contempt, they do unspeakable things, they lack conscience, and they don’t get caught. They prey upon the weak, the weak-minded, and the poor of spirit (the cowardly) at every opportunity. They do not create wealth by being fair, generous, or conscientious. Nor do they keep wealth by such means.

I wish I could share an example with you of how wealth is hoarded and carved out of the souls and chests of lesser men. But anyone of them reading it would be so offended that I would rise to a top spot on their shit list. And that would be especially stupid to promote myself into the cross hairs. [grin]

So I leave it to your imagination to fill in the details.

4. True Inspiration From My Most Popular YouTube Video by Adrienne Smith

Writes Adrienne:

… no matter what little thing you do, you can still inspire and help others.

My comment:

As the troubles of this world grow, ever greater is our yearning for the things that fuel hope. Inspire, encourage, and lift others up.

Because at the end of the day (be it six months or twelve years), when you look back on what you did online, if you inspired, encouraged and lifted others up, you will know you did something that reflects the beautiful, the good, and the true.

And that may be worth more than the million dollars that never found its way into your bank account.

And then there’s Lisa Gerber who has some insights to share about  fundraising. Indeed, the Crowdwise motto is even something to consider beyond fundraising. It applies perfectly to social media.

If you didn’t give back no one will like you.

And writing that, immediately I thought of Professor Michael Schlesinger from the Atmospheric Sciences School at the University of Illinois at Urbana. He recently edited an important book on climate change and alarming estimates of the expected impacts which will devastate communities and regions, Human-Induced Climate Change.

Well done, Adrienne.

5. The Only User Manual That You Will Ever Need by Marcus Baker

Ask, Release, Believe and Receive

Explains Marcus:

These words describe in exact sequence the way to create your ideal life using the law of attraction…

My comment:

One of the problems that I often observe about those who recommend the law of attraction is the lack of true and unembarrassed commitment to the thing as truth. In other words, people talk about it but they don’t demonstrate it. And if it is a truth, it must be demonstrable. Just as demonstrable as pain or hurt.

And we all know that everybody hurts.

I propose that 12 of us make a demonstration. Each of us make a blog post, name the thing of our desires, ask for it, release it, believe it, and receive it within three months. It should be something that is out of our natural and ordinary reach, capacity, and competence. I further propose that Marcus lead us in this spiritual demonstration, guide us in the release, and finally, tabulate, announce, and analyze the results.

Count me in on this. Who else is ready to receive!

What say you, Marcus?

Awesome post, Marcus!

6. Why do I do what I do by Janet Callaway

Asks Janet:

Do you ever stop to think about why you do what you do?

Janet shares one of her favorite quotes from Katharin Graham:

To love what you do and to feel that it matters–how could anything be more fun?

What I didn’t write:

Writes @TheJackB:

One of the reasons I am a frequent visitor to your blog is because I like surrounding myself with happy people. You always have such positive energy it is hard not to smile.

Jack’s comment took me by surprise. And I’m still grinning. Or was that scratching my head?

Anyway, I often wonder if bloggers love what they are doing. For example, I hope Margie Clayman loves what she’s doing. Because I love what she’s doing. Have you seen her last blog post, Help Me Help Guatemala?

Writes Nic Wirtz about Guatemala:

In a country where half the population survive on less than $2 a day, you don’t have to go far to find poverty. Generally it’s already looking for you.

My comment:

The story of Judy and Ed is heart warming. Thank you for sharing that awesome story with us, Janet.

If only we were all so blessed with an opportunity to sell things that we believe in with the deepest personal conviction!

Myself, there are few things for which I can rave about. And not all of those few for good reason.

Anyway, here’s five:

1. Dr. Bronner’s Magical Peppermint Soap
2. The New American Bible
3. Harrod’s Earl Grey Tea No. 42 (I’m enjoying a mug of it as I type)
4. Certified Kona Coffee Beans (lightly roasted)
5. William Shakespeare’s Collected Works

My own doubts, however, can not compete with my hope that Judy and Ed will live long, happy, and love-strong lives with the least pain possible.

Considering again my doubts, I have to smile because I remember what Betsy Cross writes here:

Sometimes the facts lie.

7. Dad Bloggers Get Paid To Blog by Jack Steiner

Writes Jack:

I want to earn enough to support my family. I tell my children that they need to push to live their dreams and not dream their lives. I can do no less.

My comment:

I like what Jack is saying.

I am trying. I am pushing. I am asking for help. It is not easy for me. I don’t like doing it and I am not sure that I am asking the right questions but I am doing my best.

That’s what any of us can do, Jack. Own it. Do. Push. Ask for help. Keep moving. Just like Danny recently did. He moved on to Jugnoo, don’t you know! In fact, a good move. Corporate clients for social media seem to be drying up.

Keep on keeping on, Jack.

Feedback

If you think that this blog post sucks, let me know in your comment and don’t forget to include a link to YOUR favorite blog post.

If you think this blog post rocks, tell me why it rocks in the comment. “Awesome,””Great post,” etc. works for me. Don’t forget to include a link to YOUR most recent blog post.

Stan Faryna
18 November 2011
Bucharest, Romania

P.S. Help me to do something beautiful! Click here.


Blog Soup 2011.10.24 A Blogger’s Digest

October 24, 2011

Blog Soup

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

I read a lot of blogs. Maybe, too many. I comment on a lot of blog posts. Maybe, too many. If you are a Triberrati, you do too.

A Triberrati is a blogger that stands out in the Triberr community. Triberr is a web app that connects bloggers and helps them to curate each other on Twitter. You can learn all about Triberr by reading any of the following posts about it.

1. James St. JohnTriberr: They Want To Change The World

2. Yomar LopezHow Triberr Changes The Competitive Landscape

3. Neicole CrepeauFriday Fives: Tips For Using Triberr

Gary Portnoy, Where everybody knows your name (Cheers theme song)

Earth Date 2011.10.24

Just some of the blogs that I commented on this week:

1. Frank’s #FollowFriday: Christian Hollingsworth by Frank Dickinson

2. Libya: Celebrations as Gaddafi Confirmed Dead by Amira Al Hussaini

3. I’m Going On House Arrest Until I Have 100,000 Twitter Followers by Christian Hollingsworth

4. The Walking Dead Lunchbox Now Available For Pre-Order! by Nicholas Teri

5. Inspiration, Horses and Alaska Chick by Amber-Lee Dibble

6. 3 Sure Ways To Never Be Happy by Anne Egros

7. You Cannot Change What You Do Not See by Danny Brown

8. Reclaiming my love of the online world by Margie Clayman

9. I Realize Blog Comments are NOT a Business Model by Marcus Sheridan

10. Why Occupy Wall Street Media Coverage Is Superficial by Donald Mazzella

11. Facebook Privacy Complaint: A Complete Breakdown by Ian Paul

12. Social media scandal and seasonal social media satire! by Peter Masters

13. The Writer’s Relationship by Barry Morris

14. Can social survive without me? by Bill Dorman

15. Howard Gardner on The True, the Beautiful, and the Good 

Christina Aguilera – Beautiful

Moveable Feasts, Scooby Snacks, Etcetera

1. Frank’s #FollowFriday: Christian Hollingsworth by Frank Dickinson

Frank writes:

“Christian Hollingsworth is an online POWERHOUSE! He’s everywhere, doing everything with everybody.”

My comment:

Christian Hollingsworth brings many good things to how he does social media:

1. Energy
2. Passion
3. Curiosity
4. Wonder
5. Friendliness
6. Commitment
7. KINDNESS

Does Christian sleep? Or does he fold time and fit 48 hours into a day? One wonders in awe.

2. Libya: Celebrations as Gaddafi Confirmed Dead by Amira Al Hussaini

After hundreds of thousands of tweets and guess work between news of him being captured, wounded, killed, or all three together, the National Transitional Council (NTC) has finally confirmed that Libyan dictator Muammar Al Gaddafi is dead.

My comment:

Gaddafi’s murder provokes questions and, perhaps, a new look at politics. It is a murder – not a death as journalists and everyone else seems to want to describe it. The world, generally speaking, wanted the man dead. Gaddafi’s death is not an accident. He did not die of natural causes. His murder was pre-meditated, prayed for, and executed with great ambition, intelligence, and force.

Are we uncomfortable to admit to the dark side of the human heart? Of our own murderous hearts?

I do not dispute the reasons which motivated the murder. Nor do I dispute the reasons which motivate the celebration of Gaddafi’s death. Gaddafi, himself, is said to have given the order to kill specific individuals and communities (men, women, and children) which opposed his Libyan rule. And I am reminded of the old saying, he who lives by the sword, dies by the sword. But this does not mean that Gaddafi’s blood is not on our hands.

I do not believe Gaddafi would have surrendered himself to Libya or the world for judgment and humiliation as did Christ. Certainly, Gaddafi was given considerable opportunity to do so and he politely and not so politely declined. But even if he was the one-eyed kind in the kingdom of the blind, he was not a lunatic until we said that he was a lunatic.

The Gaddafi that fought for his life, family, and rule until he was struck down – he was the same man that was previously received warmly as a leader, statesman, and businessman by world leaders, statesmen, and businessmen. But if the world could be said to be naive, tongue in cheek, then the Arab world is rampant with polite lunatics for Gaddafi may have been the boldest of all the arab leaders of the twenty-first century.

Certainly, he was the only one to face the so called evil West with outrageous impunity.

Gaddafi represented all of the pride and prejudice of the Islamic empire, Arab nationalism, and the “Oriental” soul. The sound and the fury!

Saddam Hussein, we all know now, was nothing more than an angry American muppet and, unfortunately for him, a pretense to reassert European (British and French) interests in oil production. Funny thing about that. The most cynical of Americans thought it was about American interests in that same oil production and how very mistaken they were and continue to be. So why did America do the dirty work for the Europeans when Europeans all along have been plotting along to abandon the dollar and force America into a long, dark night of despair?

Gaddafi represented all of the pride and prejudice of the Islamic empire, Arab nationalism, and the “Oriental” soul. The sound and the fury!

Osama bin Laden? Another angry American muppet (aka fattened calf). Little did he know his retirement in Pakistan was not a long retirement.

But like Stormbringer says to Elric in Michael Moorcocks’ Elric Saga – so the black sword (oil) said to Gaddafi: “Farewell, friend. I was a thousand times more evil than thou.”

What I have written is merely wild-eyed conjecture and speculation. Science fiction, perhaps. Any correlation to truth or any likeness to reality is merely coincidental and was intended by the author as entertainment of a mature audience.

Notes:

My comment was apparently rejected.

3. I’m Going On House Arrest Until I Have 100,000 Twitter Followers by Christian Hollingsworth

Christian says that he wants 100000 Twitter followers. Presently, he has 84,351 followers. Is he serious? Or does he just need a little attention?

My comment:

I understand the need for speed. I understand the need to do epic shizz. My call to action, motto, and self-description on my calling card or business cards have always stated this strongly.

1. Miracles on Demand
2. Do amazing things
3. Fortune Maker

My sophomore year in college, I drove “non-stop” from Los Angeles to Earlham, Indiana (about 4,000 miles if I remember correctly) in 40 hours. Of course, I had to stop for gas and when I did, I did all the other things too.

Also in my twenties, I used to do overnight powerpoint presentations for leading McKinsey and Anderson business consultants for their next morning presentations with Fortune 100 C-Suites. I ate the impossible like a snack and I was well paid for it.

And I kicked off my first start up with a proposal to use online marketing to capture a niche market for APC that I had identified myself. It opened up an international market worth tens of millions per year. I don’t think I slept more than 20 hours/week for three months to make that happen.

Um, I didn’t intend to write about me in this comment.

I see you (Christian) killing yourself to be a social media rockstar. I honor your yearning for greatness as I mentioned on Frank’s tribute to you.

But I do want you to think deeply about where you are going with all this awesome. Because I care about you.

1. Do you want to make a lot of money?
2. Do you want to change the world for the better?
3. Do you want to serve God?
4. Or, perhaps, all of the above?

You don’t need all the answers right now. But you do need the questions that your heart may search them like uncharted seas.

4. The Walking Dead Lunchbox Now Available For Pre-Order! by Nicholas Teri

A walking dead lunch box for $12? Zombie fans unite!

My comment:

I just rented Season 1 of AMC’s The Walking Dead. Saw the first episode just now. Looking forward to knock down the rest of the season tonight.

But I have to wonder what is it about zombies that has such magnetic appeal? Ok, vampires can be sexy, powerful, and forever. But I don’t think most people want to be a zombie. They smell really bad, they are ugly, and most of them are just way too slow for the dance floor.

Part of the appeal of zombies, perhaps, is the want to kill zombies. Is the appeal relevant to our unavoidable existential struggle with death and dying? Or is it as simple as killing our problems without entertaining the moral questions and emotional confusion that unsimplify our reality?

Perhaps, zombies represent life’s challenges, others, and our humble fears. Slow moving target, often and apparently lacking intelligence, and somewhat predictable. They only come as a crowd if you make too much noise. If only all our problems were just head shots and easy targets!

In his blog post, Why zombies?, Tobias Buckwell says that zombies work because…

1. Guilt free mass killing
2. Zombies represent larger societal fears including invasion, consumerism, government secrets, and weapons of mass destruction
3. Social criticism

Whatever works about the zombie genre, I must observe that the zombie problem does not suspend our own questions about good and evil, morality, goodness, and, perhaps, also truth…

In fact, the drama of the zombie brings us back to the most basic questions of being, morality and truth.

To be is good. To be alive is good. There is certain objective truth about the goodness of being and life – however, primary and elementary. To fight to stay alive is good – generally speaking.

To live, to love, and to know – all human good is founded upon these three things. In a manner of speaking, they are the natural law from which all moral and legal questions are based.

Do you like the zombie genre? Why?

5. Inspiration, Horses and Alaska Chick by Amber-Lee Dibble

Amber-Lee gives with gratitude. Not like a duty, but as a delight. Like the natural, uplifting song of wild birds in the morning.

Amber-Lee gives thanks to Janet Callaway, Margie Clayman, Steve Bloom, me, Marcus Sheridan, Danny Brown, Lisa Barone, Gini Dietrich, Bill Dorman, Mark Schaefer, Christian Hollingsworth, Aaron Biebert, and many others.

My comment:

It’s ironic that the last scene of The Walking Dead’s first episode of Season One had Altana’s zombies feeding on a horse. Because the next blog post I read was by Amber-Lee. And the title, of course, mentioned horses.

Since there’s a population of eight or so in Chisana, I don’t think there is ever going to be a zombie problem in Chisana. I’m glad about that because I think grizzlies, cold, and silence is a big enough challenge for them up there.

Amber-Lee’s story of the two horses is a wonderful parable of a world of we a la Dr. Jack King. I recommend that you read it, today.

To live, to love, and to know.

Amber-Lee’s parable speaks indirectly to the natural law, our life, and our destiny. And if you remain unclear about what it means to know, to know is to receive, eat, and drink the Beautiful, the Good, and the True.

The light of God, in other words.

For some, this is most certainly the splendor of truth that shines from the cross.

And be transformed, thereby.

6. 3 Sure Ways To Never Be Happy by Anne Egros

Anne says that three things will make you unhappy:

1. Not knowing what happiness means to you

2. Doing things you don’t like to please others

3. Blaming yourself

My comment:

Yes!

1. You should discover an understanding of happiness. Physical sensation, feelings, conscience, intuition, reason, spirit, and good authority are TOGETHER good indicators of whether or not a thing serves or prevents joy.

Be on guard against false happiness, however. For they do not fulfill you. They consume you.

2. Pleasing others for no other reason than to please others is imprudent to be sure. Likewise, displeasing others for no better reason than to contradict them is equally problematic.

Because we were meant to love one another and lift each other up insofar as we were meant to give selflessly of the Beautiful, the Good, and the True which is mirrored imperfectly through our selves.

3. The blame game is when you blame yourself without any sincere endeavor to face, fix, and avoid repeating the problem, mistake, or offense. It’s an easy trap that catches us up when we avoid responsibility, love, and humility.

Shame and anger are not virtues, but they can serve our conscience. And conscience, however fallible, ever serves as the personal and intimate revelation of the divine, the sacred, and our own humanity.

7. You Cannot Change What You Do Not See by Danny Brown

Value is difficult to appreciate – especially if it is not obvious, intense, and related to the things that matter to people. Creating obvious value in a highly competitive market often requires taking a deeper, longer look at what you are doing and what your customers want.

Danny tells the fantastic story of Nintendo’s comeback with the Wii as a parable for reinvention.

My comment:

I can’t help but think of the millions of little business bloggers being like fry in an ocean. In other words, food for bigger fish. Can any value that they create make a whale of a story? [grin]

Marcus Sheridan’s recent post, 10,862 Comments Later, I Realize Blog Comments are NOT a Business Model, suggests to me that little business bloggers may only ever be. Fish food – that is.

And so it may be that Christian Hollingsworth should be shooting for 5 million followers in five months! [grin] Because the funny thing about 100k may be an unfortunate joke on him.

What say you, Danny?

8. Reclaiming my love of the online world by Margie Clayman

Margie was disappointed by how some responded to Trey Pennington’s suicide. It made her question her enthusiasm for online community.

My comment:

What hit me hardest about Trey Pennington’s suicide was the paradox of him having 100,000+ followers and 5,000 Facebook friends (not to mention considerable admiration among social media celebrities) and still feeling so alone and overwhelmed by his problems that he killed himself in a church.

Depression is a disease. I get it. But that does not preclude further feeling, thought, and prayer on the variety of questions and problematics that his or any other suicide may provoke.

Presently, tens of thousands of Japanese people are walking that line. They are thinking about suicide. Because the tsunami and nuclear reactor meltdown has devastated their lives, family, and belief in a better future. I don’t think meds are going to save them all – if the meds were available for free. And the meds are not available to most of those Japanese people trying to negotiate one day at a time.

Like you, I believe that we can and should lift each other up – that we can use the internet to do beautiful, good, and true things. We must choose to do so. Yet I understand too that it is not easy to choose to do so each and every day. I also understand that we do not all agree on what is good and true.

Suicide, for example, is a problem with many sides. Even as a subject for discussion. For example, some feel that suicide (of a stranger or someone closer to the heart) is a personal insult and offense to their life, difficulties, and decisions. Others respond with sympathy for the dead or the family and friends of the dead. Disagreements will abound if we are honest with each other. How we negotiate such disagreements will vary.

How will we negotiate disagreements about the things for which we feel strongly and passionately (for and against)? Do we hang out only with the people that agree with us? Do we bite our tongue in the public square? When can we protest, argue, and negotiate a wider understanding that includes all of the sides of a problem without bias?

These are the questions I would like to add to your own questions about how we can make the online world shine. I hope you don’t mind.

9. I Realize Blog Comments are NOT a Business Model by Marcus Sheridan

“Over 10,000 comments and not a single customer,” reports Marcus Baker.

If you need validation, go for the comments. But if you want engagement, it’s the emails and phone call that count. That’s what Marcus seems to be saying.

My comments:

In a comment to Danny Brown, Leon Noone quotes Mark Twain:

It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.

10. Why Occupy Wall Street Media Coverage Is Superficial by Donald Mazzella

Donald writes that the media has failed to bring the protest into perspective. Journalists aren’t thinking about or investigating what’s happening in America that is fueling the inarticulate concerns of Occupy Wall Street. We just get 20 seconds on the evening news.

My comment:

Zuccotti Park, in fact, seems to be more of a small circus freak show than protest. I’m not surprised by editorials by Aaron Biebert and Eugene Farber regarding Occupy Wall Street. However, if one looks to all sides of the problem without bias, the incoherence of Zuccotti Park actually represents the breaking down of American society and life.

The reality is that nothing makes sense anymore. There are no answers and solutions. There are only more and more problems.

What’s wrong with America has become so vast and deep that it fuels intuitive and existential apprehensions which can only be understood by the protestors within their own subjective ponderance of personal problems that they immediately comprehend and experience.

In other words, Americans feel strongly that the shit has hit the fan, but they don’t understand how their own personal problems belong to a widespread failure of systemic proportions. The ship is taking on water at multiple points below deck. The intellectuals and experts, themselves, seem to lack the imagination and courage to speak honestly.

Fear is thick as fog. And visibility, consequently, is reduced.

It’s very much a need to know thing that’s going on. Between government offices as much as between government and financial institutions, government and the people, and mainstream media and the people. Some will even suggest that the freak show at Zuccotti park is allowed to go on with the show because as long as no one addresses, thinks about, and comprehends the bigger picture, apprehension will not become outrage. Myself, I find it unlikely that editors and bureau chiefs have caught a bad case of stupid.

The truth, however, will set us free. Not better marketing and political maneuvering as some might suggest.

Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness… this is not a campaign slogan. It is a sworn and inalienable guarantee. But if you don’t take it seriously as a citizen, no politician will either.

11. Facebook Privacy Complaint: A Complete Breakdown by Ian Paul

The Electronic Privacy Information Center and 14 other consumer protection groups have lodged a formal complaint against Facebook with the Federal Trade Commission.

At issue are Facebook’s Instant Personalization feature; the inability of Facebook users to make the ‘Likes and Interests’ section of their profile private; and the fact that Facebook discloses user profile information in certain ways even if a user has elected to keep that information private.

The full compliant is here via PDF.

My comment:

Yomar Lopez sent me a link to this article via Twitter. So I checked it out.

Facebook has long gamed privacy. That we know. Sometimes, Facebook is doing questionable things because it is in Facebook’s business interest. Sometimes, it does them because that’s where we need to be headed in terms of the social web. And, yes, that is also in Facebook’s business interests.

The sharing that happens with instant personalization, likes, interests, for example, is not inconsistent with the vision of a semantic web in which relevant information can be easily shared across independent communities, networks, and platforms. We all want this – more or less.

On the other hand, when you can view the private chats of your friends on Facebook, no one will agree that such a “feature” advances the quality and relevance of online life and community.

Obviously, Mark Zuckerberg lacks the maturity, conscience, and sensitivity to lead an organization such as Facebook. And that’s the bottom line.

12. Social media scandal and seasonal social media satire! by Peter Masters

Asks Peter:

“What’s happening over at Empire Avenue? Where’s all the social media love and affection gone?”

My comment:

The times they are exciting in social media as Peter observes. Empire Avenue and Klout have shaken, stirred, and unmasked the stupid clowns as John Garrett would say – if he had a mean bone in his body.

13. The Writer’s Relationship by Barry Morris

Writes Barry:

I am in a thriving relationship. I’m in relationship with my writing.

My comment:

I noticed the link on John Garrett’s Twitter feed.

I understand Barry but I am also concerned about the consequences. A great loneliness awaits Barry – when Barry’s teenage son grows up and leaves the nest. It’s not so far off, in fact.

I have always been passionate about my work – whether it is a start up, online strategy, design, writing, etc. I can devote myself to it with single-minded, intense focus. And with fierce loyalty.

But I have sometimes considered that the work does not give back like I give to the work. Nor does it keep me warm under the sheets through a long, winter night.

The work does not bring me a mug of steaming Harrod’s Earl Grey No. 42 when I am chilled. Or a tall glass of iced sweet tea on a hot summer day. Or a kiss to seal my sleep with peace.

Perhaps, the thing to do is learn from one’s love of the work and bring such passionate dedication to the one who’s kiss can seal your sleep with peace. Or inspire you to grasp the stars with a bare hand. In other words, to do the impossible.

14. Can social survive without me? by Bill Dorman

Bill Dorman is back.

My comment:

Good to have you back, Bill. You’ve been missed. I had noticed your absence and promptly informed Klout that you’ve been slacking. But never you mind about the klout foolishness.

Congrats on your hole-in-one!

You’ll be back in swing just as soon as you make your rounds and leave 100 comments at all your favorite blogs. [grin]

15. Howard Gardner on The True, the Beautiful, and the Good 

In this MOMA (Museum of Metropolitan Art) lecture, Howard Gardner reflects on the concepts of Truth, Beauty, and the Good in a postmodern, digital age.

My comment:

It is often remarked that my comments are unusual. Sometimes, intimidating. I’m not from outer space. At least, I’m not willing to admit to it.

Throughout my commentary, however, some may notice that I have reference points. For example, the Beautiful, the Good, and the True.

Greatness, virtue, the dignity of the human person, and God are also things to which I often refer. There are other things too! love, hope, and faith. Friendship. And other social media DOHs. [grin]

Yes, I want also to be interesting, memorable, and epic.

This MOMA lecture is interesting to me and I’m sharing it with you to give you a sense of my own gravity – a gravity which may be misunderstood through my comments as contention or, worse, contempt.

Note:

Comment color 237bdb

Feedback

If you think that this blog post sucks, let me know in your comment and don’t forget to include a link to YOUR favorite blog post.

If you think this blog post rocks, tell me why it rocks in the comment. “Awesome,””Great post,” etc. works for me. Don’t forget to include a link to YOUR most recent blog post.

If you’re in the mood, stop by my party and wish me a happy birthday here.

Stan Faryna
24 October 2011
Bucharest, Romania

P.S. Help me to do something beautiful. More here.

More Blog Soup

1. Blog Soup: 2011.10.06 http://wp.me/pbg0R-r7

2. Blog Soup: 2011.09.22 http://wp.me/pbg0R-pF

3. Blog Soup: 2011:10:10 http://wp.me/pbg0R-rO

4. Blog Soup. 2011:10:13 http://wp.me/pbg0R-s9

5. Blog Soup. 2011.10.17 http://wp.me/pbg0R-sq

Faryna Podcasts

1. Why do I blog: http://wp.me/pbg0R-kX

2. If Tomorrow Was Your Last Day: http://wp.me/pbg0R-la

3. Money Can’t Buy Happiness: http://wp.me/pbg0R-lv

4. The First Duty of Love is to Listen: http://wp.me/pbg0R-lO

5. Are You Ready for Love? http://wp.me/pbg0R-lX

6. Reading The Desiderata. http://wp.me/pbg0R-mr

7. What is Love? http://wp.me/pbg0R-mw

8. Confessions of a Freak-Geek-Misfit. http://wp.me/pbg0R-nJ

9. Do you love strongly? http://wp.me/pbg0R-nY

10. Empty-handed, Less Traveled Roads. http://wp.me/pbg0R-on

11. The Economics of Friendship. http://wp.me/pbg0R-oU

12. Do Not Be Afraid. http://wp.me/pbg0R-p9


#Yummm: Blog Soup 2011.10.10 by Stan Faryna

October 10, 2011

Blog Soup
by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

I read a lot of blogs. Maybe, too many. I comment on a lot of blog posts. Maybe, too many. If you are a Triberrati, you do too.

A Triberrati is a blogger that stands out in the Triberr community. Triberr is a web app that connects bloggers and helps them to curate each other on Twitter. You can learn all about Triberr by reading any of the following posts about it.

1. Yomar LopezHow Triberr Changes The Competitive Landscape

2. Jason YormarkTriberr: How I Increased My Reach to Over 300000…

3. Neicole CrepeauFriday Fives: Tips For Using Triberr

Dashboard Confessional, So Long, So Long

Earth Date 2011.10.10

Just some of the blogs that I commented on this week:

1. The world is changing. No it’s already changed by Fabrizio Faraco

2. Accept No Limitations by Robert Dempsey

3. Pasiflora and Dare to Care by Barbara Klein

4. We Just Disagree by Nancy Davis

5. A Call to Action by Betsy Cross

6. Luck or Karma? Field Lessons by Alaska Chick

7. Do You Want To Change The World? by Aaron Biebert

8. Do you ignore the road signs too? And other social media DOHs by Marcus Baker

9. My Life in Beta: Let Me Collide Into You by Dan Fonseca

10. The Five Biggest Website Secrets of A-List Bloggers by Adam Sokoloff

11. Coastline by Franziska San Pedro

12. 6 Lessons I Learned in My First Six Months by Adam Toporek

13. Check Your Level of Vibration Because It Leads to Creation by Ryan Biddulph

14. Think Small by Klaudia Jurewicz

15. The Powerful Act of Simplicity by Danny Brown

Moveable Feasts, Scooby Snacks, Etcetera

1. The world is changing. No it’s already changed by Fabrizio Faraco

The world is changing. Social media is having impact. The social web is as much opportunity as it is a threat to economies, politics, and society. Fabrizio ponders what is the next step.

My comment:

You are thinking in a critical manner, Fabrizio. You are looking at problems and challenges with a design approach. This is very important.

One of the problems in the MBA education has been a lack of preparation of design-oriented problem-solving and critical thinking. Hence, decision makers are unable to respond to the cascading social changes rocking our economics and politics.

As you have observed, the social aspect increasingly dominates other domains as the social web connects people, ideas, and interests. The online community does not just represent a voice (or many voices), but it is gaining influence and having greater impact. I discuss the questions related to this with others here:

http://osakabentures.com/2011/09/casual-collectives-tomorrow%E2%80%99s-roadkill/

If organizations do not create or support think tanks that can develop best practices, they will lose even more ground at a faster rate than the last two years. Past accomplishments will wash away like a receding shoreline with observable, new losses every six months. Because change, as we are seeing, is closely related to the rate of technological innovation, increasing mobility of online access, and the decreasing cost of increasing bandwidth.

What do you think?

2. Accept No Limitations by Robert Dempsey

Don’t let the naysayers get you down. Don’t let them hold you back. If people can’t pay you for what you do, move on. That’s what Robert Dempsey is saying.

My comment:

The Serenity prayer is a wonderful prayer. And powerful wisdom to live by.

It is worth repeating.

Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Robert is right to insist on moving out of relationships that don’t give. But for every bad apple that you toss, make three new friends. You may have to connect with 100 people to find those three, but the opportunity is there thanks to Facebook, Twitter, etc.

How many people did you connect with today through Facebook comments, blog comments, Twitter, or email?

3. Pasiflora and Dare to Care by Barbara Klein

My comment:

Often, it is easier to give $5 to a cause that is out there. We feel good about our selves because we have exercised our compassion and caring for the world. It’s good that we do good for a stranger. Yet we must also do good to those near us. It is harder to do. Our own transformations, however, demands this of us too.

Thank you for reminding us, Barbara.

4. We Just Disagree by Nancy Davis

Disagreement does not have to be as bad as we imagine the worst of it. That’s what Nancy Davis is thinking about. Opposing viewpoints may be difficult to negotiate for the best of us, but a variety of opinions may, in fact, serve us to consider the wider range of a subject beyond our own personal borders.

My comment:

Social media has come to be dominated by a “happy place” mode of thinking. Most believe a happy place is preferable to the troll wars of pre-Twitter and pre-Facebook days. Because a happy place facilitates connection. But does a happy place facilitate engagement, community, and collaboration?

In fact, a happy place does not facilitate engagement, community, and collaboration because it fuels insincerity, delusion, and counterfeit relationships. A happy place excludes disagreement and contention about the most important things. People can’t commit to each other because they can only agree to agree to the things that they will not question.

Such agreements, obviously, are made on a receding shoreline of trivial interests, ignorance, and disloyalty.

Disagreement without personal insult is preferable. But it is difficult to practice because there is no commitment to a resolution. In other words, agreeing to disagree gets us no where. If we are going to agree to disagree, then we must also agree to disagree with our commitment to negotiate the disagreement to a mutually satisfying conclusion.

That is not a happy place. It is where love is.

5. A Call to Action by Betsy Cross

The phone rings at 3:30am. She learns that her 45 year old sister has just died. And that she will have to take an active role in her father’s care.

My comment:

Bets reminds us that we grow by showing up in all our relationships – online and offline. I’m reminded of Barbara Klein’s blog post (above). And suddenly I see in the corner of my eye, a glimpse of a sign.

Big hug to you, Bets!

And the question that comes to my mind is: Where am I not showing up, today?

6. Luck or Karma? Field Lessons by Alaska Chick

A Dall Sheep and a Yukon Bull Moose are handsome prizes for the big game hunter. But among prizes, the hard-won prize is the most savored.

My comment:

Everyone talks about customer service and care, but few know how to do it when things go wrong. Amber-Lee of Pioneer Outfitters is the exception. She cares. Whether its about getting off a mountain in time or bagging the long anticipated trophy, she puts her all into making dreams come true.

Thanks for sharing your story with us, Amber-Lee.

I’m reminded of Betsy’s blog post:

http://silentleaves.wordpress.com/2011/09/23/a-call-to-action/

It’s also about showing up. About caring. Right now. Where you are.

Are you listening?

7. Do You Want To Change The World? by Aaron Biebert

“If you really want to change the world, you must do it publicly,” writes Aaron. Because if you don’t, others will not be able join you in your endeavor.

My comment:

As strange as it may sound, some of the walk is the talk. Ideas must be shared, minds must meet, and hearts must feel strongly. About the same things.

Bets is dead on: Show up!

Note: Disqus failed to take my comment.

8. Do you ignore the road signs too? And other social media DOHs by Marcus Baker

Marcus Baker guest posted on my blog and I’m so glad he did. Is it confirmation or coincidence? Don’t miss this post.

My comment:

There’s so much awesome here. From Marcus’ essay to the comments – there’s so much beautiful here. Just saying.

9. My Life in Beta: Let Me Collide Into You by Dan Fonseca

Dan admits that he needs inspiration, ideas, and complementary juice to turn his half-baked things into something that matters.

He has a lot of questions. He wonders about the American Dream, borderless identity and ideas, and lots of other things that he has some hunches about.

My comment:

Important ideas can take a long time to incubate, implement, and have impact. I’d also like to point out that the best ideas contribute to the conversation for a long time. For example, Aristotle’s thinking about virtue remains relevant to our questions about happiness today. 2300+ years later.

As you say, hunches can be slow and awkward. Hence, hunches need to come together, mingle, and grow.

Like the American founding fathers observed, politics makes strange bed fellows. But their idea of politics was more about doing what’s right than doing what is expedient. If they put up with argumentative and stubborn bed fellows, they did so in service to something higher than their personal and immediate interest. They served a common hope for a more perfect government – a government that would serve the people in an enduring answer to the necessity of government.

Without a commitment to community, ideas will be shared less, minds will not meet often, nor hearts share the same strong feelings.

I engage others in a discussion about online community here: http://osakabentures.com/2011/09/casual-collectives-tomorrow%E2%80%99s-roadkill/

Please join us. Everyone. We all have something to contribute and share.

10. The Five Biggest Website Secrets of A-List Bloggers by Adam Sokoloff

Consumers self-educate – fast. The sales paradigm has shifted. The new black is inbound marketing. That’s what Adam Sokoloff is saying.

Create compelling content. Convert traffic into leads. Cultivate relationships with emails and automatic email responders. Build a community and care about it. Measure the results, fix problems, improve upon what you are doing. Be consistent, stay the course, and be persistent.

My comment:

That’s six sign posts, Adam!

But there’s a seventh too. If you want to make money on the web, sell something that people need… (here’s the kicker) to make money on the web. The point is not explicit, but it is implicit. Adam’s insights, he suggests, are all predicated on driving the success of his B2B business of custom signs and graphics.

Aye, there’s the rub. As Hamlet stammered and his eyes clouded with tears.

Most bloggers don’t have something people obviously need to advance their online business. The two cents offered by an e-book is typically worth exactly that. Two cents. Because if making money by blogging was that easy, a million of us would be millionaire bloggers – regardless of the impossibility of that economic feat!

11. Coastline by Franziska San Pedro

A thumbnail of Franziska’s painting of a coastline.

My comment:

Irony or sign? I’ve been thinking about the receding shorelines of connection, community, and caring. And here is a dramatic image of a coastline as if it is about to be swallowed by an untamed sea.

12. 6 Lessons I Learned in My First Six Months by Adam Toporek

“Social media… it just never stops!” says Adam. He’s learned some things in his six months as a blogger. Or has he? [grin]

My comment:

You [Adam] offer some much needed insight to the blogger – and social media apprentice.

For example, move on if you are trying to make a connection and there is no outcome. Of course, you can’t expect engagement from making one comment on someone’s blog, but if it hasn’t happened after a dozen thoughtful and heart-felt comments, move on.

Another important point that you make: there’s some people you’ll never catch up with. They eat a dozen blogs for breakfast with a side order of Twitter and Facebook. Do what you can do. Do it with heart. That’s what counts.

Looks like you are giving some competition to the most charming of new bloggers ever, Mr. Dorman. [grin]

13. Check Your Level of Vibration Because It Leads to Creation by Ryan Biddulph

Ryan says that you need to choose your attitude. Check it often. Because where you are defines what you do.

My comment:

The Beach Boys sang all I need to know about good vibrations. But I understand what Ryan is talking about. Attitude. Choosing it. Keeping it on. Letting it shape what you do into a creative and powerful outcome.

In this regard, Ryan is dead on.

14. Think Small by Klaudia Jurewicz

Less stuff, more happiness. That’s what Klaudia is saying. So is Graham Hill.

My comment:

Love the Ted video of Graham Hill. Thanks for that, Klaudia. Down-sizing isn’t just about corporations and governments.

15. The Powerful Act of Simplicity by Danny Brown

Danny’s message? Sometimes, it’s the simplest things that are the most elaborate of all.

My comment:

Dashboard Confessional’s So Long, So Long: nice song, Danny.

And the videography is powerful.

But, maybe, too powerful. I found myself paying too much attention to the moving pictures. [grin]

I’ll have to play it again to listen to the words…

Stan Faryna
10 October 2011
Bucharest, Romania

P.S. Your $5 can make a difference. If you can get 10 of your friends to give $5 too, you will make an even bigger difference. Please help Nisha to help others.

More Blog Soup

1. Blog Soup: 2011.10.06 http://wp.me/pbg0R-r7

2. Blog Soup: 2011.09.22 http://wp.me/pbg0R-pF

Faryna Podcasts

1. Why do I blog: http://wp.me/pbg0R-kX

2. If Tomorrow Was Your Last Day: http://wp.me/pbg0R-la

3. Money Can’t Buy Happiness: http://wp.me/pbg0R-lv

4. The First Duty of Love is to Listen: http://wp.me/pbg0R-lO

5. Are You Ready for Love? http://wp.me/pbg0R-lX

6. Reading The Desiderata. http://wp.me/pbg0R-mr

7. What is Love? http://wp.me/pbg0R-mw

8. Confessions of a Freak-Geek-Misfit. http://wp.me/pbg0R-nJ

9. Do you love strongly? http://wp.me/pbg0R-nY

10. Empty-handed, Less Traveled Roads. http://wp.me/pbg0R-on

11. The Economics of Friendship. http://wp.me/pbg0R-oU

12. Do Not Be Afraid. http://wp.me/pbg0R-p9

Note: If you want to make a professional podcast out of your blog post, get in touch with Adrian Klein onTwitter or Facebook.


Are You Ready for Love? And Other Social Media DOHs. Faryna Podcast EP5. #nicheamnesty

July 25, 2011

Are You Ready for Love? And Other Social Media DOHs (aka Stan Faryna feat Moby)
by Stan Faryna

Play the soundcloud player to hear the podcast. Or download it here. The podcast sounds awesome with earphones or played on hi-fi speakers. Try it and tell me what you think.

Mobile users: you should be able to hear the podcast here.

This blog post was inspired by @makeness, @mylifestylemax, @janetcallaway, @drjackking, and a few other people that don’t do Twitter.

I’m letting them go. Things. All the things that don’t make me happy. Right now.

See them fly away. Read the rest of this entry »


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