Why does email suck?

March 17, 2011

Email sucks

Founder of Digg, Kevin Rose says, email sucks.

Rose cites his stats: 938 unread work emails. 1002 unread personal emails.

I know the feeling.

My Gmail stats:

Inbox: 28175
Facebook: 8210
Twitter: 6136

I won’t even mention how many emails are unread. If you really want to engage me, send me a message in Facebook. Or tweet me in Twitter.

As I commented at James McCullough’s blog, Four Sides… the problem is the email app – not email.

Digg’s former CEO Kevin Rose is mistaken to emphasize email as the problem. Rose’s three sentence solution is a ruthless yet savvy approach for keeping up with the demands of accelerated communications in a high speed world.

But it doesn’t solve the problem of the out-dated email app.

Facebook

In the not so distant past, I have argued that one driver of Facebook’s rise to almost universal appeal was how people use Facebook messages as a substitute for personal email. People effectively connect and communicate with friends and family though Facebook in a superior manner to personal email. Unfortunately for Google, Yahoo and Hotmail, Facebook effectively makes the generic personal email account so 2002. In other words, obsolete.

I’m sure that Facebook hasn’t figured this out as succinctly as I have stated it. But the move to Facebook mail addresses suggests that Mark Zuckerberg might have a clue – as hard as that might be to imagine.

Fforward this: The next step for Facebook is to make the messaging center relevant in terms of mail/message management. Done well, this would be the game-changer that would make Google less relevant. It very well could be an obituary for Yahoo.

A killer email app

The killer email app will be:

  1. Engaging
  2. So easy to set up filters that a dummy like me can do it in 1 minute or less
  3. Present decision-making information in a clear and actionable way

It’s that simple.

Who wants to build that with me?

Stan Faryna
17 March 2011
Bucharest, Romania

If you’d like to connect with me, follow @Faryna and tweet me up on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/faryna

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About Stan Faryna

Mr. Faryna is the founder and co-founder of several technology, design and communication companies in the United States and Europe including Faryna & Associates, Inc., Halo Interactive, and others.

Stan Faryna served as a Global Voices author and translator. Global Voices is a non-profit global citizens’ media project founded at Harvard Law School’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, a research think-tank focused on the Internet’s impact on society.

His political, scholarly, social and technical opinions have appeared in The Chicago DefenderJurnalul NationalThe Washington TimesSagarSaptamana FinanciaraSocial Justice Review, and other publications.

Mr. Faryna also served as editor-in-chief of Black and Right (Praeger Press, 1996), a landmark collection of socio-political essays by important American thinkers including U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

Copyright

Copyright 1996 to 2012 by Stan Faryna.

Here’s my fair use policy for my content:

If you want to share my content with your own audience, you may quote a brief excerpt, if and only if, you provide proper attribution (Source: The unofficial blog of Stan Faryna) with a direct link to the source. Generally speaking, as long as you are not acting as an agent or on behalf of a corporation or institution, I am not interested in any payment for the quotation or use of a complete article. Nevertheless, you may not republish or translate the entire article without my written permission. Send your request for permission via Facebook. Or tweet me up me on Twitter.



Buzzfuse: How to Make Better Pie (part three)

March 12, 2008

Notes from a Patsak:

It is in our nature to want to share things with each other. It is in us, a humanistic impulse to do things that allow us to integrate different knowledge, opinions, feelings, and ideas into a sustainable community. It’s up to you if you want to do something important here and now. If you do want to do something great, a new kind of social interaction can grow through Buzzfuse and around it. And, then, we have a sure thing – a sure thing that we can own, together.

Do you believe that the internet can save your soul? Or, at least our humanity?

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Recap of part one and two of my pie review

If you missed my first post about Buzzfuse (Try Pie. Try), go here. If you missed my second post (Delivery and Drive-thru Pie), go here.

After a little over a month of testing, I can honestly say that I like what Buzzfuse is about, what it’s doing, and where it is going. It is a groovey social mechanism for self-promotion- especially if you are a blogger, musician, photographer, etc. There’s a lot of potential in the Buzzfuse community, and things are going to get crazy soon as the word gets out that premium-member creators actually have a chance to bring home more than milk money from the earnings pool.

Buzzfuse supports content creators; it helps them market content and rewards creators for the rich content that brings content hunters. As such, Buzzfuse seems to be an ideal online business partner for the aspiring writer, photographer and musician. Buzzfuse has defined a very important niche for content creators and, hopefully, consumers are going to find they get a lot more out of Buzzfuse than other social media engines such as Digg and Stumbleupon.

The Buzzfuse service represents a meaningful innovation of social media; it provides a welcome alternative to the bad network marketing of online mlm and get rich schemes which push soul-less content at the media cafe. As such, it sets an important direction in the blogosphere just in time for newbies who are thinking about selling out their souls.

How to make Pie

You don’t have to start with an original idea. Just take a headline out of the news and chew on it.
Read the rest of this entry »


Buzzfuse: Delivery and Drive-thru Pie (part two)

March 12, 2008

Notes from a Patsak:

After a month plus of testing, I can honestly say that I like what Buzzfuse is about, what it’s doing, and where it is going. It is a groovey social mechanism for self-promotion- especially if you are a blogger, musician, photographer, etc. There’s a lot of potential in the Buzzfuse community, and things are going to get crazy soon as the word gets out that premium-member creators actually have a chance to bring home more than milk money from the earnings pool.

Will you sing for pie? Weebl will sing (below)!

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Previous post on Buzzfuse

In my previous post on Buzzfuse, I provided some quick and dirty insight on some of the most popular social search/ social media engines out there: Blinklist, Del.icio.us, Digg, Fark, Furl, Ma.gnolia, Newsvine, Reddit, Simpy, Stumbleupon, and Tailrank. Although some use these engines for online self-promotion; these engines were not designed for such purposes and they are all, somehow, inadequate for helping the unknown creator market content to a larger audience.

If you didn’t see it and you want to read it now, click here.

Buzzfuse = Pie

Buzzfuse supports content creators; it helps them market content and rewards creators for the rich content that brings content hunters. As such, Buzzfuse seems to be an ideal business partner for the aspiring writer, photographer and musician. I have been testing it out for just over a month since I found G’s invitation to try pie in Linkedin. I’m ready to pronounce my review.
Read the rest of this entry »


Buzzfuse: Try Pie. Try. A first spoonful.

March 11, 2008

Notes from a Patsak:

Buzzfuse extends the social media bubble with self-promotion services and earnings for content creators. Finally, someone appreciates content creators- Buzzfuse. Find out why Buzzfuse is so different from popular social media/ social search engines such as Blinklist, Del.icio.us, Digg, Fark, Furl, Ma.gnolia, Newsvine, Reddit, Simpy, Stumbleupon, Tailrank, and Technorati.

Remember Kids in the Hall? Below, a happy pie song from old skool Canadian comics.
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Social self-promotion engine

There are too few social media and social search engines that can help the web two-oh!-er share themselves through content (opinion, snap shots of personal life, photography, or whatever) without outrageous costs or risk of online reputation.

Buzzfuse, a social media marketing engine out of South Africa, is an answer to at least two important questions that self-promoting newbies and veterans often ask themselves:

1. How can I reach out and share myself with the millions of internet users out there?

2. Can I make more than milk money doing so?
Read the rest of this entry »


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