Romanian Parliament makes a totalitarian move

Five cents will not even buy you a spoken paragraph of no particular value in Bablion. So consider yourself lucky that you found me…

The Romanian Parliament makes a totalitarian move by signing the controversial Lisbon Treaty without engaging a national conversation about the advantages and disadvantages to be expected if the Treaty is realized. Such a move is not the first example of the authoritarian disregard for Law, Order and Constitution by Romanian leaders- but it seems to be the most shameless prostitution of the Romanian state by a democratically-elected Parliament.

“Romania is for sale” below is a parody of the Romanian state (non-english and no subtitles)

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Totalitarian Move

Last month, Romania’s Parliament agreed to sign the controversial Lisbon Treaty. Romanian officials were very pleased to exercise their authority as members of the European Union on February 4th. French President Nicolas Sarkozy even came to show his support, have a drink, and meet some nice girls. Interestingly, the Romanian government did not feel any duty or obligaion to communicate to the Romanian people the purpose and specifics of the Lisbon treaty, its impact on the Romanian constitution (if accepted by the European Union) or what this means for Romania’s independence in the future.

Romania has joined Hungary, Slovenia and Malta as signers to a treaty that the western member states (France included) are still thinking about. The singing was, indeed, historic but not as an initiative of a European collaboration. Instead, it is a historic event in which a democratically-elected parliament makes a clear and unmistakable totalitarian move.

The Romanian people had neither notice to fully consider the treaty nor opportunity to deliberate on the possible constitutional changes that would be effected. If the Lisbon Treaty is accepted by other member states of the EU, the Lisbon treaty will be effected in 2009. Questions remain, however, about whether or not the UK will accept this treaty. In the UK, there is some concern about the way civil liberties will be redefined.

Four weeks later, a brief mention of the Lisbon Treaty and the proud Romanian officials was made in a report by the Romanian National News Agency. Still no details regarding the import of the Treaty were given. Being an American, this kind of political process strikes me as odd. Had the same shenanigan happened in the USA, I imagine we would be several weeks into a bloody and miserable overthrow of the present government as permitted (nay, instructed!) to us by the U.S. Constitution.

Treaty of Lisbon

A more complete summary of the changes proposed by the Lisbon treaty can be found here.

In general, the Treaty of Lisbon appears to keep a large share of institutional modifications that were agreed upon in the European Constitution, such as a permanent EU president, a foreign minister, the same distribution of parliamentary seats, a reduced number of commissioners, opportunity to secede from the EU, and a full legal personality for the EU government. We might remember that the European Constitution was, ultimately, rejected and postponed as too many critics believed it merely organized a new European bureaucracy with centralized powers and economic force at the cost of the independence and fitness of Western member states.

Theoretically, the new status of centralized bureaucracy as provided by the Treaty of Lisbon will allow EU leadership to sign international agreements without the approval of member nations and, perhaps, against the interest of those member states. Such status may imply other things, but I haven’t had the opportunity to review it further.

Other developments include institutionalization of the Council and Central Bank, civil rights, and a more authoritative foreign affairs office. In fact, the European Council and European Central Bank would both become official institutions. The 54-article Charter of Fundamental Rights which lists citizens’ political, social and economic rights would be integrated into the EU Constitution and become legally binding upon member states of the EU.

Regarding foreign relation commissions, posts will be reduced and foreign relations and security policies will fall under a central bureaucratic office for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy headed by a managing director, so to speak, with the very impressive title, The High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy.

After some debate in June, there seems to be an agreement that member states will be initially allowed to continue to conduct the individual interests of their state through their own foreign affairs offices and embassies. Theoretically, however, larger issues which might concern the EU will be handled by the EU office. This does not bode well for Romania, because it tends to lack experience and tact in foreign diplomacy and they will have great difficulty negotiating their interests with a politically savvy EU office for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy.

A new voting procedure would be introduced in the Council of the European Union for legislation. Interestingly, the procedure does not require unanimous decisions. A “qualified majority” will be reached when a majority of all member countries (55%) who represent a majority of all citizens (65%) vote in favour of the proposal. It’s not hard to imagine that a member state ‘s interests could easily be ignored for the greater good of other states – especially states have a little more savvy statesmen than the kind of Romanian authorities that Anthony Bourdain dealt with regarding his paid travel review of Romania.

When the Council is not acting on a proposal from the Commission, the necessary majority of all member countries must be 72% but the population requirement (65%) stays the same. Should there be disagreement about the legislation, a minimum of four countries must expressly act against the proposal.

PM Caline Popescu-Tariceanu

While EU representatives from the UK and other countries are negotiating for special options, Romania quickly signed on the dotted line as an exercise of its voting rights as a member state of the EU. Contrary to Prime Minister Calin Popescu-Tariceanau belief in the acceptance of the Treaty of Lisbon as somehow a significant Romanian contribution to the negotiation and development of the Treaty, the self-congratulating Romanian official doesn’t seem to understand that merely exercising such a right does not demonstrate anything meritorious- or any contribution.

Apparently, most of the members of the Romanian Parliament closed their hearts to any sense of Democratic spirit as they voted for the Treaty. In fact, they failed to understand their responsibilities and duties to the Romanian people and Constitution when making such decisions. Neither can it be said they made contribution (no official sources report any disputes and amendments proposed by Romania) nor that Parliament voted with deliberate agreement to the Treaty.

Some of Romanian’s best and brightest used to tell about how they learned about Freedom and Democracy from Georgetown University. As if you could trust the Jesuits! Romanians are in deep cacat.

Stan Faryna comments on Tariceanu’s comments

My comments are in brackets.

In the February report of the National Romanian Disinformation Agency (released March 4, 2008), Tariceanu was quoted as saying that, “the ratification of the Treaty of Lisbon by Romania is an important progress for us [Romania] and for Europe, too. By our involvement in this project [because resistance is futile and assimilation will begin immediately], we have already proven the solid commitment [puppethood] to the European cause.”

“We have proven we have the capacity to constructively promote [hand over] our interest, in a manner similar to the general European interests [not Romanian interests].”

“We can be proud that we took part in such an exercise [sell out], which strengthened our European profile [as a nation that has no greater destiny than serving Western Europe]. Romanian citizens can be certain that their interests are promoted [handed over] at European level.”

[Nietzsche’s donkey can be heard amidst the loud, play-back applause to Tariceanu, braying, Yee-Yah, Yee-Yah.]

Stan Faryna
March 06, 2008
Bucharest, Romania

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Postscript:

Anthony Bourdain of the travel television show, No Reservation, came to Romania and he is unlikely to return. The actual Romanian show is unlikely to represent his true feelings as what we see is some kind of compromise between his experience and the money he received from the National Romanian Tourism Office. The show became something of a controversy and hundreds of Romanians protested his so-called ignorance. Anyway, I enjoyed his occasional disparaging remark here and there through the show. The six segments of that one episode are below.

Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservation, The Romania Show, Episode one

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Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservation, The Romania Show, Episode two

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Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservation, The Romania Show, Episode three

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Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservation, The Romania Show, Episode four

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Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservation, The Romania Show, Episode five

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Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservation, The Romania Show, Episode six

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About Stan Faryna

He is the founder and co-founder of several technology, design and communication companies in the United States and Europe including Faryna & Associates, Inc., Halo Interactive, and others.

His political, scholarly, social and technical opinions have appeared in The Chicago Defender, Jurnalul National, The Washington Times, Sagar, Saptamana Financiara, Social Justice Review, and other publications.

Mr. Faryna is editor-in-chief of Black and Right (Praeger Press, 1996), a landmark collection of socio-political essays by important American thinkers including U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

Copyright

Copyright 1996 to 2008 by Stan Faryna.

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