Blog Soup 2011.11.07 Unbid Tears, Love, Hope, and Imagination

Blog Soup

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

Blog Soup 2011.11.07. Unbid Tears, Love, Hope, and A Little Imagination

On the street I saw a small girl cold and shivering in a thin dress, with little hope of a decent meal. I became angry and said to God; “Why did you permit this? Why don’t you do something about it?”

For a while God said nothing.

That night he replied, quite suddenly:

“I certainly did something about it. I made you.”

– invisiblepeople

I read a lot of blogs. Maybe, too many. I comment on a lot of blog posts. Maybe, too many. If you are a Triberrati, you do too.

A Triberrati is a blogger that stands out in the Triberr community. Triberr is a web app that connects bloggers and helps them to curate each other on Twitter. You can learn all about Triberr by reading any of the following posts about it.

1. James St. JohnTriberr: They Want To Change The World

2. Yomar LopezHow Triberr Changes The Competitive Landscape

3. Neicole CrepeauFriday Fives: Tips For Using Triberr

Gary Portnoy, Where everybody knows your name (Cheers theme song)

2011.11.07

Allow me to share with you this poem by the American poet Raymond A. Foss, The Suffering of a Righteous Man.

May it take no more suffering of a righteous man
for us to see the error of the ways, the loss in
the coarseness of our land, the silver lining
may it shine, for all to see, heed its call
to reconcile to each other, seal the breach
the loss we all share, the responsibility too
to make the bonds anew in troubled times
reclaim that which was lost before he fell
the latest metaphor, the latest martyr
to a failed collective age
all about me no more for we cannot
will not understand the taking the pain
of innocent blood, holy blood shed
so that we might see, change our ways
act now act differently to one another
to each other, as the son gave his life
for our sins, may we acknowledge
the sacrifice just paid for what it is
a chance to change course
heal this city, reclaim it for our own
neighbor by neighborhood.

Brené Brown, Strong Feelings, and an Invitation to Do More than Imagine

Most of my readers will know of Brené Brown from her TED Talk about the power of vulnerability. Brown relates human happiness to human connection and whole-heartedness. Those who are most happy are those who live whole-heartedly, explains Brown.

More importantly, Brown explains that to live whole-heartedly means to feel strongly including strong feelings of compassion, sorrow, empathy, disappointment, shame, etc.

I mention Brené Brown because this edition of blog soup invites you to feel strongly. On a Monday – no less! This blog post invites you to struggle with strong feelings of sorrow, shame, and compassion. This blog soup is about human pain, suffering, and need. It invites you to share in feelings that are as wide as humanity and the world AND reach as high as heaven.

If you believe in God, I invite you to share in one of the most profound feelings that radiate from the heart of the Creator. For those who know anything about God, know that God looks upon us, into us, and through us with a constant sorrow and sympathy – not scorn!

If you do not believe in God, I invite you to share in a feeling that unifies the human family at it’s most profound and collective depth.

The invitation is not to a deliquescent, drug-like emotion to be tasted because it can be tasted and blow our minds. The invitation is to participate in creation, to realize our passion through action, and to make this a better world today, immediately!

This invitation is partly what social media is about. And if not at all, social media has been a waste of human effort, hope, and imagination.

Featured

Just some of the blogs that I recently commented on:

1. A Blogging Hiatus Till We Get This Done by Margie Clayman

2. Homeless Kids in Public Schools by Mark Horvath

3. Is your criticism based on reality? by Carey Fuller

4. Taylor and Mike via invisible people

5. Finding joy through The C.A.R.E. Movement by Christian Hollingsworth

6. A Matter of Trust by Nancy Davis

7. Love doesn’t have to cost anything by Bonnie Squires

John Lennon, Imagination

Blog Soup

Just some of the blogs that I recently commented on:

1. A Blogging Hiatus Till We Get This Done by Margie Clayman

Marjorie Clayman wants you to donate $12 to Luma Mufleh’s Fugee village.

My comment:

I was over at Amber-Lee Diddle’s blog and Amber-Lee insisted that we check out Marjorie’s blog post about Fugee village.

The good news is that Marjorie is going to blog again. She’s not going to continue with her blogging sit out until 400,000 people donate $12 each to Fugee village. The better news is that she helped get more than 60 people to make donations to Fugee village.

Some may suggest Marjorie is an impetuous drama queen, but I understand her want to do something epic for a good cause. I understand Marjorie Clayman’s urgent and deeply sincere want to see something happen right now. There is no reason we should hold Margie to the fire by her ankles.

After all, I am trying to give away some cool things to help Nisha Varghese. You can see it here. But it looks like I have failed to succeed to inspire people to give to Nisha’s cause. I can’t even boast being responsible for 60 donations of $5. And I won’t hold it against the world.

For me, it’s in God’s hands. I showed up. I did all that I could do. And so did Marjorie Clayman. She showed up and so did her friends: Amber-Lee, Nancy Davis, Eleanor Biddulph, Brandon Duncan, and others.

I appreciate you, Margie Clayman.

2. Homeless Kids in Public Schools by Mark Horvath

Mark Horvath interviews Marian Riner of the Fayetteville Public School system. Her office is a food and clothing pantry. They discuss the growing problem of child homelessness.

My comment:

Mark Horvath shows up for a lot of people in need. God bless him. Follow Mark on Twitter at @hardlynormal, he often throws out beautiful opportunities to help people in a number of ways.

As Marian tells it, things are getting worse. School Districts across America are trying to be there for families in crisis.

Though it may be difficult to imagine, there are currently 1,500,000 homeless kids in America according to Diane Nilan, Founder and President of HEAR US.

You rock, Mark! Keep fighting the good fight! Because there ain’t a better fighter than you.

3. Is your criticism based on reality? by Carey Fuller

Carey Fuller is a homeless parent in Seattle. She works two jobs and lives in a van with her children. In her video, Carey shares the common challenges trying to keep her family together – challenges which you or I have no idea about.

Writes one commenter who confirms the challenges that Carey speaks about:

Being homeless is exhausting in EVERY way imaginable. My schedule looked a lot like yours. Find somewhere to park > Try to sleep > Find somewhere to cleanup in the AM > Get the kids to school > Call places for help/look for a job > Pick the kids up > REWIND!

My comment:

Carey, I admire your tremendous courage and humility. My prayers are with you.

Reflecting on Carey’s struggle, I can hear John Lennon singing the words:

Imagine all the people sharing all the world. You may say that I’m a dreamer. But I’m not the only one…

Forty years ago, John Lennon’s Imagine hit number one on the UK charts. More about that here and here.

4. Taylor and Mike via invisible people

Mike and his six year old daughter Taylor live in a homeless shelter in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mike was hurt at work and without income they lost everything.

My comment:

The homeless have a story. Mark Horvath, Carey Fuller, and others allow their voices to be hear. In this video, Taylor and Mike speak from their heart.

Mike talks about the difference between the homeless and the helpless, the growing incidence of family homelessness, and how he wished he could find work.

Six year old Taylor can’t wait for them to get out of the shelter. “This is crazy!” she says.

5. Finding joy through The C.A.R.E. Movement by Christian Hollingsworth

Christian Hollingsworth interviews Al Smith of the C.A.R.E. Movement.

CARE is an acronym for; Communicate, Appreciate, Respect, Encourage. We offer Positive Attitude Solutions to improve morale and attitudes in the workplace and at home.

My comment:

As many of us bloggers have discovered, Al Smith found that he could share his heart, concerns, and inspirations with the world via blogging.

Good advice from Al:

Just find one thing to hold onto, when life is tough. I also have to agree with Al. That the first step toward serenity is gratitude.

This week, Al is hanging out with the Kellie Walker and Erika Napoletano and sharing the CARE message at TEDx Peachtree.

6. A Matter of Trust by Nancy Davis

Nancy Davis is guest posting on Al Smith’s blog.

Nancy writes about the challenges of overcoming a lifetime of mistrust, abuse, and violence.

My comment:

God bless you, Nancy. I’m praying for you. Hold on to hope, humility, and gratitude – no matter what happens. They will see you through when life is tough.

What I didn’t write:

I was surprised to read the comment by Ameena Falchetto.

Ameena writes:

I actually don’t trust many people.

I don’t know why Ameena’s comment took me by surprise. Because she was honest? Or because I didn’t expect an outgoing blogger like Ameena to feel that way about the world?

Trust, I believe, is a cornerstone of engagement, human relationship, community, government, business, civilization, knowledge, science, hope… and, yeah, everything beautiful, good, and true!

And yet I am intimately familiar with betrayal, abuse, violence, crime, disappointment, unfair competition, slander, etc.

It’s not all or nothing with me except for the most exceptional or unfortunate of cases. Forgiveness, for example, is an important decision that I cannot ignore in my response to others – even those who have harmed me.

So, yes, I continue to take risks in matters of trust especially in regards to friendship, love, faith, or compassion. Nor am I so agile, deft, or insensitive to avoid considerable and deep pain, disappointment, and deception.

Eye of the Tiger, Ameena?! [big hug] Who are you fighting, silly?

I’ve got a new, more powerful mantra for your consideration: All You Need is Love

7. Love doesn’t have to cost anything by Bonnie Squires

Writes Bonnie:

Money is tight for a lot of people these days. But that doesn’t mean the love has to stop.

My comment:

Bonnie describes 10 free or low cost ways to show up. To appreciate, to give thanks, and to be kind. It’s an old post, but a very, very good post.

As usual, Bonnie also links to good blog posts by cool bloggers such as Richard Bejah, Erica Mallison, and Gini Dietrich.

Feedback

If you think that this blog post sucks, let me know in your comment and don’t forget to include a link to YOUR favorite blog post.

If you think this blog post rocks, tell me why it rocks in the comment. “Awesome,””Great post,” etc. works for me. Don’t forget to include a link to YOUR most recent blog post.

Stan Faryna
07 November 2011
Bucharest, Romania

P.S. Help me to do something beautiful! Click here.

13 Responses to Blog Soup 2011.11.07 Unbid Tears, Love, Hope, and Imagination

  1. Hey Stan, I actually thought about that comment after I wrote it and thought maybe I should elaborate…. but decided not to. Interesting you picked up on it.

    I’ve had my fair share of knocks in life – I choose not to dwell on them but it does make me cautious as to where I leave myself open. I consider myself to be brutally honest (to a fault at times).

    Do we have to trust lots of people? I don’t think so. I can still love, appreciate, admire, and respect without trusting everyone.

    Interesting post Stan! And, yes, we all need the eye of the tiger sometimes 🙂 and lots of LOVE.

    Latest post: The myth of privacy online http://ameenafalchetto.com/socialmedia/myth-of-privacy-online/

    • Stan Faryna says:

      Forgive me, Ameena, if it felt that I put too much attention on your comment. It really struck me. I felt that I understood you (I live in Romania after all) and yet I also needed to struggle with the paradox.

      Yes, we can still love, appreciate, admire, and respect others without trusting others. But is something missing without some semblance of trust?

      Obviously, I continue to work through this Catch 22. [sigh]

  2. Betsy Cross says:

    There’s so much more to life when you can see your part in alleviating suffering. It dwarfs all of our insecurities, doubts, trust issues or whatever else is stopping us from living up to our potential, our happiness.
    Yesterday we talked about compassion at church. The difference between sympathy and empathy, and how Christ was empathetic. He truly loved (s) us. And how the small things like listening, smiling, offering help instead of just sympathy, like a shoulder to cry on, a meal, a warm bed, are things that empathetic people do. And they feel more joy because they feel like they are connecting at a deeper level than most.
    I love this music video. My daughter sang this song years ago at church one Sunday. She has an amazing gift. It makes me cry every time I watch it. Enjoy:

    Good job, Stan.
    Loved it!
    Betsy

    • Stan Faryna says:

      There is great joy, relief, and peace in deep connection with the other. You are absolutely right, Betsy. As you write, those connections that are borne in empathy, service, giving, friendship, and love – they go deep. They unite us in humanity, spiritually, and in ways we cannot even begin to comprehend.

  3. adrianklein says:

    Thank you Dude for this one!

  4. Hey there, Stan. Thank you for the link and mention. Very decent of you.

    Margie did what a lot of people wouldn’t. She tried. I respect her for that and many other things. She’s a great person with a big heart, and I’m glad to have met her (even if only online.)

    • Stan Faryna says:

      Margie rocks! And so do you, Brandon. The way you responded with action to Margie’s call to compassion was nothing less than awesome.

  5. billdorman says:

    Trust, as in anything I think there are certain levels. I am probably too trusting at times but also try to take a big picture approach and realize people are just going to let you down at times. I’m sure I’ve done my share but I try to be a man of my word and do what I say I will do.

    In my volunteer work with the Guardian ad Litem program I see many a family that is just one step away from being homeless and know it’s a huge struggle for the kids to ‘fit in’ at school. Sometimes it’s hard for these kids to be positive, but a lot of times they do find things that make them happy.

    There is plenty of suffering and needy to go around, sometimes you have to roll up your sleeves and just try to be impactful one kid at a time. This is where I feel I can do the most good……….

    • Stan Faryna says:

      Bill, you ever give new evidence of all my intuitions about what a great guy you are and all the praises that I have sung about you across the comments. I write this without the least sarcasm!

      The Guardian ad litem program is a good thing. And I have to imagine it serves abused and neglected children better than I had imagined since Bill Dorman is involved.

      http://guardianadlitem6.org/flash/video.php

      Like you and Bruce Sallan (elsewhere) have suggested, we can make this world better by committing ourselves to fully helping one person at a time. Of course, $5 here and $12 there to this charity or that is also doable and worthwhile for most of us, but the commitment to truly care for a person or child, one at a time, is, perhaps, more meaningful.

      Respect, Bill!

  6. As usual, I’m impressed with Blog Soup. I still don’t know how you manage to keep it all organized!

    • Stan Faryna says:

      The verdict is still out, Gini. Is it divine or diabolical inspiration? [laughing]

      I hope it is the former.

      I’m still working on the recipe, but I’m really neither clever nor a genius. Hopefully, the blog soup will only get better and better.

Speak from your heart!

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: