Mixed Epiphanies: @Yogizilla @marcandangel @ginidietrich @tom_peters @marcus_baker #blogsoup

February 6, 2012

blog soup 02.06.2012

Mixed Epiphanies for a Monday

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

Cheers Theme Song

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Judgment Day

December 31, 2011

Judgment Day

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

Christian Hollingsworth

I’ve been trying to write a blog post to wrap up the year. It’s not coming easily to the keyboard. My mind is distracted by pain. I am surrounded by it in a manner of speaking. My stomach, my bowels, my back, my legs, etcetera. I have several challenges to overcome and my recovery from salmonella is slower than I like.

The one human being that stands out this year. The one man that stands above all others for me. The one young man this year for which I am most grateful of another’s service to me is Christian Hollingsworth. His Week of Faryna rocked my world, his very generous donation to Nisha’s water project rocked my heart, and his personal card of encouragement that I received by post -it lifted me up.

Not because the Week of Faryna is fresh on my list of people and things for which I am grateful!

The timing, however, is perfect. Because it was a difficult year set with many challenges and, yes, even traps and petty conspiracies. Nonetheless, it is good to end the year overwhelmed with gratitude. Read the rest of this entry »


Blog Soup 2011.11.18 What are you doing online? Why?

November 18, 2011

Blog Soup

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

Blog Soup 2011.11.18 What are you doing online? Why?

What are you doing with your life? What are you doing online? What is your purpose? What is your function? Why?

You don’t know? Have you considered the advice of the Duchess to Alice (Alice of Wonderland)?

Be what you would seem to be — or, if you’d like it put more simply — Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise.

About Blog Soup

I read a lot of blogs. Maybe, too many. I comment on a lot of blog posts. Maybe, too many. If you are a Triberrati, you do too.

A Triberrati is a blogger that stands out in the Triberr community. Triberr is a web app that connects bloggers and helps them to curate each other on Twitter. You can learn all about Triberr by reading any of the following posts about it.

1. Nicole Humphrey CookThe Idiots Guide to Triberr Tutorial

2. Yomar LopezHow Triberr Changes The Competitive Landscape

3. Neicole CrepeauFriday Fives: Tips For Using Triberr

I intend to write pithy, poignant comments that may help you truly rediscover yourself through the blog posts of friends and strangers. In terms of your journey of self discovery, the destinations are not as important as is your own personal negotiation of the questions, answers, and confusions which you may discover by following a link, reading a blog post, poring over comments, and making a comment. On the other hand, this is our community and, yes, community is all about our commitment to the community, conversations, consensus, disagreement, participation, and, yes, to each other.

I will fail often in this endeavor, but I can, as Booker T. Washington said, keep on keeping on. Will you humor me?

Gary Portnoy, Where everybody knows your name (Cheers theme song)

2011.11.18

Caterpillar:

Who are YOU?

Alice:

This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. I — I hardly know, sir, just at present — at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.

Featured

The blog posts that I commented on in this Blog Soup:

1. Don’t Skype your community away by Bill Dorman

2. Stop looking for success and happiness by Craig McBreen

3. Butthead Asking Dumb Questions?! Are You? by Akos Fintor

4. True Inspiration From My Most Popular YouTube Video by Adrienne Smith

5. The Only User Manual That You Will Ever Need by Marcus Baker

6. Why do I do what I do by Janet Callaway

7. Dad Bloggers Get Paid To Blog by Jack Steiner


The Crests, Trouble in Paradise

Blog Soup

My unabashed comments:

1. Don’t Skype your community away by Bill Dorman

Bill Dorman has been wondering what happened to the party. Where did everyone go? Was it the speedos? Or skype? Of course, this is Bill being tongue in cheek and charming.

My comment:

It’s not the Skype, Bill. It’s not the speedos. You’re a stand up guy. You’re likable. You’re sexy. Oops! There’s that word again. 

Everybody wants you at their party. And I’m not teasing you, Bill.

The problems are several. And I know you’ve been waiting for me to sum it up. After all, that’s what I do. I go deep and think it through because I can. [grin] Of course, I can try to dish it out with my own tongue in cheek. But I’ll never do it with your finesse, Bill.

5. High School Prejudice

Some people lack the professional culture to deal with people they don’t like. In other words, they haven’t graduated from high school. So if they see someone they don’t like hanging out at your place, they may stop coming by.

It’s their loss, Bill. I continue to contribute at several watering holes despite the frauds, fucktards, and stupid clowns that frequent the same.

4. Faking it is no fun

Most people just can’t fake it forever. They need to get off. [grin]

Being positive, encouraging, and kindly when your trudging through the bull shit can try anyone’s patience. Some do it day in and out without any hard evidence of tomorrow’s reward and they will pick up their toys and head home – sooner or later.

3. This Ain’t Easy Street

It just doesn’t work. Not you, Bill! Blogging!!! It’s not the game changer they hoped it would be. Because it ain’t easy. It takes work. Not everyone can succeed. And there’s no guarantees for success even for those that show promise. Granted, it takes the average Joe or Jane three to six months to figure that out. 

2. Boot Lickers and Suck Ups

It’s not obvious that you’re in the in crowd. Are you best buddies with 12 B-list bloggers and a minimum of three A-list bloggers?

Do they mention you, give you props, and throw you a link in their blog posts from time to time?

People need a reason to suck up and lick boot.

1. Where’s the Money?

You don’t have a weekly “how to” on how someone can easily move and improve it by an inch.

Bill, they need to pay bills. They have the need to succeed.

You keep doing what you are doing. Lift your allies with you as you level up. Give it three years and you’ll be an online authority. Perhaps, a sensation! Mark my words, Bill.

2. Stop looking for success and happiness by Craig McBreen

Writes Craig McBreen:

Self-help is for suckers.

My comment:

Amen.

Reading the statement, “I rock. I will succeed because I rock hard,” one hundred times will not make you successful. Thinking that statement one hundred times won’t do it. Writing that statement one hundred times won’t do it either. Because that’s not how magic and fairy tales work.

Life is hard.

That’s what James writes here.

Magic comes from killing dragons, demons, and all the things that own you through fear. Fairy tales are the stories of fears faced and conquered, virtues exercised in decision and action, and the triumph of the hero, heroine, or saint.

Don’t just do it. And don’t just do something. Do good, do it often, and do it well.

Awesome post, Craig!

3. Butthead Asking Dumb Questions?! Are You? by Akos Fintor

Ako’s Twitter Bio Statement:

Helping others to break limiting beliefs about success. One belief at a time.

Akos asks you if you are asking the right questions?

What can I learn from this or How can I turn this around?

My comment:

When the fuck does it get easier?

That’s what Frank Dickinson asks via a reposted guest post by @LisaMilesBrady.

It just happens that I have some thoughts to share.

I am personally acquainted with dozens of millionaires and former millionaires. A handful inherited their wealth. Most of them made their wealth by mostly illegal means. Only a handful of these acquaintances made their wealth by strictly legal, honest, good decisions, and hard work. Most of the latter have lost their wealth.

Having spent considerable time and intimate conversation with such persons, I can tell you that their successes had little to do with asking themselves questions, being positive, and doing the right thing. The most common answer, being in the right place at the right time, is a euphemism.

A euphemism is a substitution of an inoffensive term for one considered offensively explicit and scandalous.

Few are driven simply by greed, a will to power, and a want to make the world around them – their empire. Most are fueled by fear, hatred, and contempt, they do unspeakable things, they lack conscience, and they don’t get caught. They prey upon the weak, the weak-minded, and the poor of spirit (the cowardly) at every opportunity. They do not create wealth by being fair, generous, or conscientious. Nor do they keep wealth by such means.

I wish I could share an example with you of how wealth is hoarded and carved out of the souls and chests of lesser men. But anyone of them reading it would be so offended that I would rise to a top spot on their shit list. And that would be especially stupid to promote myself into the cross hairs. [grin]

So I leave it to your imagination to fill in the details.

4. True Inspiration From My Most Popular YouTube Video by Adrienne Smith

Writes Adrienne:

… no matter what little thing you do, you can still inspire and help others.

My comment:

As the troubles of this world grow, ever greater is our yearning for the things that fuel hope. Inspire, encourage, and lift others up.

Because at the end of the day (be it six months or twelve years), when you look back on what you did online, if you inspired, encouraged and lifted others up, you will know you did something that reflects the beautiful, the good, and the true.

And that may be worth more than the million dollars that never found its way into your bank account.

And then there’s Lisa Gerber who has some insights to share about  fundraising. Indeed, the Crowdwise motto is even something to consider beyond fundraising. It applies perfectly to social media.

If you didn’t give back no one will like you.

And writing that, immediately I thought of Professor Michael Schlesinger from the Atmospheric Sciences School at the University of Illinois at Urbana. He recently edited an important book on climate change and alarming estimates of the expected impacts which will devastate communities and regions, Human-Induced Climate Change.

Well done, Adrienne.

5. The Only User Manual That You Will Ever Need by Marcus Baker

Ask, Release, Believe and Receive

Explains Marcus:

These words describe in exact sequence the way to create your ideal life using the law of attraction…

My comment:

One of the problems that I often observe about those who recommend the law of attraction is the lack of true and unembarrassed commitment to the thing as truth. In other words, people talk about it but they don’t demonstrate it. And if it is a truth, it must be demonstrable. Just as demonstrable as pain or hurt.

And we all know that everybody hurts.

I propose that 12 of us make a demonstration. Each of us make a blog post, name the thing of our desires, ask for it, release it, believe it, and receive it within three months. It should be something that is out of our natural and ordinary reach, capacity, and competence. I further propose that Marcus lead us in this spiritual demonstration, guide us in the release, and finally, tabulate, announce, and analyze the results.

Count me in on this. Who else is ready to receive!

What say you, Marcus?

Awesome post, Marcus!

6. Why do I do what I do by Janet Callaway

Asks Janet:

Do you ever stop to think about why you do what you do?

Janet shares one of her favorite quotes from Katharin Graham:

To love what you do and to feel that it matters–how could anything be more fun?

What I didn’t write:

Writes @TheJackB:

One of the reasons I am a frequent visitor to your blog is because I like surrounding myself with happy people. You always have such positive energy it is hard not to smile.

Jack’s comment took me by surprise. And I’m still grinning. Or was that scratching my head?

Anyway, I often wonder if bloggers love what they are doing. For example, I hope Margie Clayman loves what she’s doing. Because I love what she’s doing. Have you seen her last blog post, Help Me Help Guatemala?

Writes Nic Wirtz about Guatemala:

In a country where half the population survive on less than $2 a day, you don’t have to go far to find poverty. Generally it’s already looking for you.

My comment:

The story of Judy and Ed is heart warming. Thank you for sharing that awesome story with us, Janet.

If only we were all so blessed with an opportunity to sell things that we believe in with the deepest personal conviction!

Myself, there are few things for which I can rave about. And not all of those few for good reason.

Anyway, here’s five:

1. Dr. Bronner’s Magical Peppermint Soap
2. The New American Bible
3. Harrod’s Earl Grey Tea No. 42 (I’m enjoying a mug of it as I type)
4. Certified Kona Coffee Beans (lightly roasted)
5. William Shakespeare’s Collected Works

My own doubts, however, can not compete with my hope that Judy and Ed will live long, happy, and love-strong lives with the least pain possible.

Considering again my doubts, I have to smile because I remember what Betsy Cross writes here:

Sometimes the facts lie.

7. Dad Bloggers Get Paid To Blog by Jack Steiner

Writes Jack:

I want to earn enough to support my family. I tell my children that they need to push to live their dreams and not dream their lives. I can do no less.

My comment:

I like what Jack is saying.

I am trying. I am pushing. I am asking for help. It is not easy for me. I don’t like doing it and I am not sure that I am asking the right questions but I am doing my best.

That’s what any of us can do, Jack. Own it. Do. Push. Ask for help. Keep moving. Just like Danny recently did. He moved on to Jugnoo, don’t you know! In fact, a good move. Corporate clients for social media seem to be drying up.

Keep on keeping on, Jack.

Feedback

If you think that this blog post sucks, let me know in your comment and don’t forget to include a link to YOUR favorite blog post.

If you think this blog post rocks, tell me why it rocks in the comment. “Awesome,””Great post,” etc. works for me. Don’t forget to include a link to YOUR most recent blog post.

Stan Faryna
18 November 2011
Bucharest, Romania

P.S. Help me to do something beautiful! Click here.


Blog Soup 2011.11.11 Veterans, Epic Expectations, and Gnashing of Teeth

November 11, 2011

Blog Soup

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

Blog Soup 2011.11.11 Veterans, Epic Expectations, and Gnashing of Teeth

Is there no end to the despair of social media! How many more will end their lives because their last best hope, social media, fails to change their material condition? How many deaths did not make it back to us as news?

And writing this, I know, that a blog post and a brief message will not deter anyone who searches to end their misery – once and for all. Pain is a test, a blessing, an oppressor, a teacher, and a tyrant – what it is to you depends upon your response. Your response depends entirely upon the things and people that are written upon your heart.

Today, I honor the men and women of our armed services who have given their lives, partly or wholly, for our nation. Regardless of whether their orders were right or wrong, they gave of themselves in service, duty, and discipline. That giving is to be honored. It is right and just to honor our veterans – those lost and those living.

When our veterans served us, they believed with all their hearts that there is more to life than wealth, fame, and power.

A tribute to our troops! This is not an endorsement of Oliver North.

If the bottom line for you is wealth, fame, and power – I grieve for you with all my heart.

There are greater things than these and the greatest of these is love.

But love must be fought for. Fight for love as if your life depended on it. Because in a very deep sense, your life and the lives of those written upon your heart, in fact, depends on it.

Read the rest of this entry »


#Yummm: Blog Soup 2011.10.10 by Stan Faryna

October 10, 2011

Blog Soup
by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

I read a lot of blogs. Maybe, too many. I comment on a lot of blog posts. Maybe, too many. If you are a Triberrati, you do too.

A Triberrati is a blogger that stands out in the Triberr community. Triberr is a web app that connects bloggers and helps them to curate each other on Twitter. You can learn all about Triberr by reading any of the following posts about it.

1. Yomar LopezHow Triberr Changes The Competitive Landscape

2. Jason YormarkTriberr: How I Increased My Reach to Over 300000…

3. Neicole CrepeauFriday Fives: Tips For Using Triberr

Dashboard Confessional, So Long, So Long

Earth Date 2011.10.10

Just some of the blogs that I commented on this week:

1. The world is changing. No it’s already changed by Fabrizio Faraco

2. Accept No Limitations by Robert Dempsey

3. Pasiflora and Dare to Care by Barbara Klein

4. We Just Disagree by Nancy Davis

5. A Call to Action by Betsy Cross

6. Luck or Karma? Field Lessons by Alaska Chick

7. Do You Want To Change The World? by Aaron Biebert

8. Do you ignore the road signs too? And other social media DOHs by Marcus Baker

9. My Life in Beta: Let Me Collide Into You by Dan Fonseca

10. The Five Biggest Website Secrets of A-List Bloggers by Adam Sokoloff

11. Coastline by Franziska San Pedro

12. 6 Lessons I Learned in My First Six Months by Adam Toporek

13. Check Your Level of Vibration Because It Leads to Creation by Ryan Biddulph

14. Think Small by Klaudia Jurewicz

15. The Powerful Act of Simplicity by Danny Brown

Moveable Feasts, Scooby Snacks, Etcetera

1. The world is changing. No it’s already changed by Fabrizio Faraco

The world is changing. Social media is having impact. The social web is as much opportunity as it is a threat to economies, politics, and society. Fabrizio ponders what is the next step.

My comment:

You are thinking in a critical manner, Fabrizio. You are looking at problems and challenges with a design approach. This is very important.

One of the problems in the MBA education has been a lack of preparation of design-oriented problem-solving and critical thinking. Hence, decision makers are unable to respond to the cascading social changes rocking our economics and politics.

As you have observed, the social aspect increasingly dominates other domains as the social web connects people, ideas, and interests. The online community does not just represent a voice (or many voices), but it is gaining influence and having greater impact. I discuss the questions related to this with others here:

http://osakabentures.com/2011/09/casual-collectives-tomorrow%E2%80%99s-roadkill/

If organizations do not create or support think tanks that can develop best practices, they will lose even more ground at a faster rate than the last two years. Past accomplishments will wash away like a receding shoreline with observable, new losses every six months. Because change, as we are seeing, is closely related to the rate of technological innovation, increasing mobility of online access, and the decreasing cost of increasing bandwidth.

What do you think?

2. Accept No Limitations by Robert Dempsey

Don’t let the naysayers get you down. Don’t let them hold you back. If people can’t pay you for what you do, move on. That’s what Robert Dempsey is saying.

My comment:

The Serenity prayer is a wonderful prayer. And powerful wisdom to live by.

It is worth repeating.

Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Robert is right to insist on moving out of relationships that don’t give. But for every bad apple that you toss, make three new friends. You may have to connect with 100 people to find those three, but the opportunity is there thanks to Facebook, Twitter, etc.

How many people did you connect with today through Facebook comments, blog comments, Twitter, or email?

3. Pasiflora and Dare to Care by Barbara Klein

My comment:

Often, it is easier to give $5 to a cause that is out there. We feel good about our selves because we have exercised our compassion and caring for the world. It’s good that we do good for a stranger. Yet we must also do good to those near us. It is harder to do. Our own transformations, however, demands this of us too.

Thank you for reminding us, Barbara.

4. We Just Disagree by Nancy Davis

Disagreement does not have to be as bad as we imagine the worst of it. That’s what Nancy Davis is thinking about. Opposing viewpoints may be difficult to negotiate for the best of us, but a variety of opinions may, in fact, serve us to consider the wider range of a subject beyond our own personal borders.

My comment:

Social media has come to be dominated by a “happy place” mode of thinking. Most believe a happy place is preferable to the troll wars of pre-Twitter and pre-Facebook days. Because a happy place facilitates connection. But does a happy place facilitate engagement, community, and collaboration?

In fact, a happy place does not facilitate engagement, community, and collaboration because it fuels insincerity, delusion, and counterfeit relationships. A happy place excludes disagreement and contention about the most important things. People can’t commit to each other because they can only agree to agree to the things that they will not question.

Such agreements, obviously, are made on a receding shoreline of trivial interests, ignorance, and disloyalty.

Disagreement without personal insult is preferable. But it is difficult to practice because there is no commitment to a resolution. In other words, agreeing to disagree gets us no where. If we are going to agree to disagree, then we must also agree to disagree with our commitment to negotiate the disagreement to a mutually satisfying conclusion.

That is not a happy place. It is where love is.

5. A Call to Action by Betsy Cross

The phone rings at 3:30am. She learns that her 45 year old sister has just died. And that she will have to take an active role in her father’s care.

My comment:

Bets reminds us that we grow by showing up in all our relationships – online and offline. I’m reminded of Barbara Klein’s blog post (above). And suddenly I see in the corner of my eye, a glimpse of a sign.

Big hug to you, Bets!

And the question that comes to my mind is: Where am I not showing up, today?

6. Luck or Karma? Field Lessons by Alaska Chick

A Dall Sheep and a Yukon Bull Moose are handsome prizes for the big game hunter. But among prizes, the hard-won prize is the most savored.

My comment:

Everyone talks about customer service and care, but few know how to do it when things go wrong. Amber-Lee of Pioneer Outfitters is the exception. She cares. Whether its about getting off a mountain in time or bagging the long anticipated trophy, she puts her all into making dreams come true.

Thanks for sharing your story with us, Amber-Lee.

I’m reminded of Betsy’s blog post:

http://silentleaves.wordpress.com/2011/09/23/a-call-to-action/

It’s also about showing up. About caring. Right now. Where you are.

Are you listening?

7. Do You Want To Change The World? by Aaron Biebert

“If you really want to change the world, you must do it publicly,” writes Aaron. Because if you don’t, others will not be able join you in your endeavor.

My comment:

As strange as it may sound, some of the walk is the talk. Ideas must be shared, minds must meet, and hearts must feel strongly. About the same things.

Bets is dead on: Show up!

Note: Disqus failed to take my comment.

8. Do you ignore the road signs too? And other social media DOHs by Marcus Baker

Marcus Baker guest posted on my blog and I’m so glad he did. Is it confirmation or coincidence? Don’t miss this post.

My comment:

There’s so much awesome here. From Marcus’ essay to the comments – there’s so much beautiful here. Just saying.

9. My Life in Beta: Let Me Collide Into You by Dan Fonseca

Dan admits that he needs inspiration, ideas, and complementary juice to turn his half-baked things into something that matters.

He has a lot of questions. He wonders about the American Dream, borderless identity and ideas, and lots of other things that he has some hunches about.

My comment:

Important ideas can take a long time to incubate, implement, and have impact. I’d also like to point out that the best ideas contribute to the conversation for a long time. For example, Aristotle’s thinking about virtue remains relevant to our questions about happiness today. 2300+ years later.

As you say, hunches can be slow and awkward. Hence, hunches need to come together, mingle, and grow.

Like the American founding fathers observed, politics makes strange bed fellows. But their idea of politics was more about doing what’s right than doing what is expedient. If they put up with argumentative and stubborn bed fellows, they did so in service to something higher than their personal and immediate interest. They served a common hope for a more perfect government – a government that would serve the people in an enduring answer to the necessity of government.

Without a commitment to community, ideas will be shared less, minds will not meet often, nor hearts share the same strong feelings.

I engage others in a discussion about online community here: http://osakabentures.com/2011/09/casual-collectives-tomorrow%E2%80%99s-roadkill/

Please join us. Everyone. We all have something to contribute and share.

10. The Five Biggest Website Secrets of A-List Bloggers by Adam Sokoloff

Consumers self-educate – fast. The sales paradigm has shifted. The new black is inbound marketing. That’s what Adam Sokoloff is saying.

Create compelling content. Convert traffic into leads. Cultivate relationships with emails and automatic email responders. Build a community and care about it. Measure the results, fix problems, improve upon what you are doing. Be consistent, stay the course, and be persistent.

My comment:

That’s six sign posts, Adam!

But there’s a seventh too. If you want to make money on the web, sell something that people need… (here’s the kicker) to make money on the web. The point is not explicit, but it is implicit. Adam’s insights, he suggests, are all predicated on driving the success of his B2B business of custom signs and graphics.

Aye, there’s the rub. As Hamlet stammered and his eyes clouded with tears.

Most bloggers don’t have something people obviously need to advance their online business. The two cents offered by an e-book is typically worth exactly that. Two cents. Because if making money by blogging was that easy, a million of us would be millionaire bloggers – regardless of the impossibility of that economic feat!

11. Coastline by Franziska San Pedro

A thumbnail of Franziska’s painting of a coastline.

My comment:

Irony or sign? I’ve been thinking about the receding shorelines of connection, community, and caring. And here is a dramatic image of a coastline as if it is about to be swallowed by an untamed sea.

12. 6 Lessons I Learned in My First Six Months by Adam Toporek

“Social media… it just never stops!” says Adam. He’s learned some things in his six months as a blogger. Or has he? [grin]

My comment:

You [Adam] offer some much needed insight to the blogger – and social media apprentice.

For example, move on if you are trying to make a connection and there is no outcome. Of course, you can’t expect engagement from making one comment on someone’s blog, but if it hasn’t happened after a dozen thoughtful and heart-felt comments, move on.

Another important point that you make: there’s some people you’ll never catch up with. They eat a dozen blogs for breakfast with a side order of Twitter and Facebook. Do what you can do. Do it with heart. That’s what counts.

Looks like you are giving some competition to the most charming of new bloggers ever, Mr. Dorman. [grin]

13. Check Your Level of Vibration Because It Leads to Creation by Ryan Biddulph

Ryan says that you need to choose your attitude. Check it often. Because where you are defines what you do.

My comment:

The Beach Boys sang all I need to know about good vibrations. But I understand what Ryan is talking about. Attitude. Choosing it. Keeping it on. Letting it shape what you do into a creative and powerful outcome.

In this regard, Ryan is dead on.

14. Think Small by Klaudia Jurewicz

Less stuff, more happiness. That’s what Klaudia is saying. So is Graham Hill.

My comment:

Love the Ted video of Graham Hill. Thanks for that, Klaudia. Down-sizing isn’t just about corporations and governments.

15. The Powerful Act of Simplicity by Danny Brown

Danny’s message? Sometimes, it’s the simplest things that are the most elaborate of all.

My comment:

Dashboard Confessional’s So Long, So Long: nice song, Danny.

And the videography is powerful.

But, maybe, too powerful. I found myself paying too much attention to the moving pictures. [grin]

I’ll have to play it again to listen to the words…

Stan Faryna
10 October 2011
Bucharest, Romania

P.S. Your $5 can make a difference. If you can get 10 of your friends to give $5 too, you will make an even bigger difference. Please help Nisha to help others.

More Blog Soup

1. Blog Soup: 2011.10.06 http://wp.me/pbg0R-r7

2. Blog Soup: 2011.09.22 http://wp.me/pbg0R-pF

Faryna Podcasts

1. Why do I blog: http://wp.me/pbg0R-kX

2. If Tomorrow Was Your Last Day: http://wp.me/pbg0R-la

3. Money Can’t Buy Happiness: http://wp.me/pbg0R-lv

4. The First Duty of Love is to Listen: http://wp.me/pbg0R-lO

5. Are You Ready for Love? http://wp.me/pbg0R-lX

6. Reading The Desiderata. http://wp.me/pbg0R-mr

7. What is Love? http://wp.me/pbg0R-mw

8. Confessions of a Freak-Geek-Misfit. http://wp.me/pbg0R-nJ

9. Do you love strongly? http://wp.me/pbg0R-nY

10. Empty-handed, Less Traveled Roads. http://wp.me/pbg0R-on

11. The Economics of Friendship. http://wp.me/pbg0R-oU

12. Do Not Be Afraid. http://wp.me/pbg0R-p9

Note: If you want to make a professional podcast out of your blog post, get in touch with Adrian Klein onTwitter or Facebook.


Do you ignore the road signs too? And other social media DOHs.

October 7, 2011

Sign of Confirmation or Coincidence?
by Marcus Baker 

Foreword by Stan Faryna

Today is a good day. For me. And for you. Because below is Marcus Baker’s essay about signs. It is not about simple road signs (stop signs, yield signs, etc), but signs that beckon us to our true self, our destiny, and opportunity. Signs beckon us closer like a gesture that asks us lean our head closer to listen to a friend or lover who offers a secret or confidence whispered with great concern or deepest affection.

Signs are not annunciations. An annunciation as Leonardo da Vinci , Tiziano Vecelli (Titian), or El Greco portray in their paintings by the same name… is unmistakable in it’s divine authority. It is authoritative, explicit, and glorious. An annunciation, like a revelation, is the indisputable, unchangeable, and irrevocable truth.

And coming in, he said to her, “Greetings, favored one! The Lord is with you.” Luke 1:28

The angel Gabriel greets Mary and informs her that she will soon be with child, that her child was the son of God, and to name her son, Jesus.

An annunciation is wonderful. Like Love at the door, joyfully and enthusiastically calling out – “Hi, honey! I’m home!

I have often wondered if signs are for those of us who cannot bear to see and hear the truth.

Lean in and listen to what is spoken to you through Marcus’ words. Pay attention. You need to clear the next 30 minutes on your schedule. It shouldn’t take you more than 15 minutes to read it, but it will take you another 15 minutes to listen. Or more. Do that now: clear your schedule for this conference of hearts.  Do this – before you dive into this king’s ransom of iridescent pearls.

Why? I explain here.

I asked Marcus permission to re-publish his blog post here (see below) because I believe it important and useful. One reading is neither sufficient for me. Nor for you.

Marcus graciously agreed to my request and, also, to reply to your comments here.

Thank you, Marcus.

Stan Faryna
Bucharest, Romania
7 October 2011

Enigma, Return to Innocence

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Blog Soup: A blog log of a servant triberratus 2011.10.06

October 6, 2011

Blog Soup
by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna

I read a lot of blogs. Maybe, too many. I comment on a lot of blog posts. Maybe, too many. If you are a Triberrati, you do too.

A Triberrati is a blogger that stands out in the Triberr community. Triberr is a web app that connects bloggers and helps them to curate each other on Twitter. You can learn all about Triberr by reading any of the following posts about it.

1. Yomar LopezHow Triberr Changes The Competitive Landscape

2. Jason YormarkTriberr: How I Increased My Reach to Over 300000…

3. Neicole CrepeauFriday Fives: Tips For Using Triberr

Soggy Bottom Boys, I’m A Man Of Constant Sorrow

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