Mohammed Nabbous, A Servant Leader in Libya

March 20, 2011

What does a journalist do?

Recently, I turned up the volume on the problematic regarding the corporate bias of the modern news organization-media empire. I have questioned the privilege of media agents who do not represent the public interest, health, welfare, hope and aspiration for a better country – agents that serve the interests of the corporate bottom line. They pass themselves off as the press. As journalists. And it’s really that bad. But there are also those who measure up. They stand above. They are an example to follow.

Mohammed Nabbous stands among several recent heroes of the press.

Mohammed Nabbous (Mo to many) may have been the first citizen journalist to share the terror and horror of Gaddafi’s attempt to silence Feb 17th protesters in Libya. Mo broadcast live from Benghazi from the beginning of the Libyan revolution. He captured the world’s attention with his online video, commentary and blogging. He founded Libya Alhurra TV. You can watch some of Mo’s reports here. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Darth Aol, A Princess, And A Legend of a Free Press

March 18, 2011

Return of the Jedi-ess

Sooner or later, Techcrunch’s Alexia Tsotsis will master the graceful art of the kowtow. Or join the ranks of freelance writers who struggle to pay the rent, story to story. OR not. Perhaps, Alexia will become a freedom fighter celebrated for her snarky courage and determination. Certainly, Alexia imagines that all her klout gives her the right to criticize her employer’s evil ways. Yeah, we’re talking about AOL.

You can read how Princess Alexia spanks Darth Aol here.

As a fellow Trojan (we are both alumni of the University of Southern California), I should be sympathetic just because! Fight on, Alexia! “Fight On!” was our motto at USC.

On the other hand, she’s fighting a bigger fight – the kind of fight that I can get excited about. Alexia is fighting corruption. She may not even know it. But Alexia is fighting the corruption of the press – an institution whose relevance to Freedom and Democracy was once considered so vital that it necessitated unambiguous protection by a Constitutional Amendment. Read the rest of this entry »