How to Succeed in The Thank You Economy

April 5, 2011

Walk This Way, Run-DMC
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A Thank You Economy

Reach, connection and relationship is crucial to your success, whether you are an industry professional, artist, writer, problogger, or whatever. Social Media provides that channel – be it Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin, FourSquare, a blog or some/all of these together.

Tim O’Reilly sums up the nature of social media here. He says that, “you gain and bestow status” through those you read, mention, retweet, recommend, like, comment…

This is the engine of the thank you economy.

In the thank you economy, dismissal, neglect and omission are punishment.

In O’Reilly’s words: “Obscurity is a bigger problem for authors than piracy.” Read the rest of this entry »


A Brief History of Making Lots of Money Online

April 5, 2011

A Brief History of Making Lots of Money Online

by Stan Faryna

Stan Faryna plays Castleville

 

Back in Black, AC/DC
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Old School

Back in 95 (1995), there was an excitement about the internet that bubbled and foamed like an uncorked bottle of fine champagne. Online entrepreneurs (netpreneurs) were aiming for million dollar exits. Those were fast times. It was a race and no one knew anything for sure – not even Harvard MBAs and McKinseyites who tried their luck at prophesy and online savvy.

Enthusiasm, hubris and dream substituted for a complete lack of insight and caution.

Not unlike what people are doing now, we were putting our dreams and ideas out there. Some of us even had traffic. I had 100,000+ unique visitors per month with an average of 10 pages viewed per visitor. But I couldn’t monetize that traffic. Nor could others. Online advertising, as we know it now, would take five years to start thinking about how it would capture the online potential. Read the rest of this entry »


DOH! I can’t believe I’m putting this out there! What’s wrong with me?!

March 31, 2011

For my friend, K. May God be with him.

Where is the Love, The Black Eyed Peas
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Sucking in Syria

Syrian protesters are dying. Everyday, it seems. Maybe, eight were killed yesterday. Four, the day before. More Syrians will die, tomorrow. Through links on Twitter, I’m getting to see some videos of the dead and dying. There’s blood. Tears. Crying. There’s the crack of AK47s.

The protesters are demanding Freedom. Change. Opportunity. Reform. They want to make a better world.

Syrians are not just dying. They are being murdered. The killing is intentional.

Protesters are being murdered by soldiers or police who have been ordered to do so by their government. They might not look like you or me. They may not even speak the same language. But, unless, you are hopelessly all wrapped up in you, you know that other people are losing the people that they love and care about. In an instant.

In a gruesome, grim, split-second instant, love seems to be cancelled.

Read the rest of this entry »


Facebook Games, The Grapes of Wrath, And a World of We

March 30, 2011

Oh – The Grapes of Wrath are spreading across Facebook Games like Kudzu

Social Games

Wildly embraced initially, Facebook games have become a huge disappointment to players. Hundreds of millions of farms have been abandoned, crops have withered, propeller capped sheep are on the verge of extinction, and farmers aren’t talking to their friends. The good news is that the flood of game-related wall spam has passed. But it didn’t just happen to Farmville. It happened across the board; Facebook games are failing to retain and entertain a restless market of 500+ Million Facebook gamers.

Game industry experts like Playdom Creative Director David Rohrl somehow got it wrong about what casual game play should be in a social game. As Rohrl himself noted, the social gaming space is not straightforward. One of the obvious fails was that social game companies fell into trap of thinking that graphics can substitute for game play. If only that were true, the economics would be unreal! On the other hand, players wanted more cuteness. They demanded it in the forums. Clicks confirmed it.

Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor Company, however, cautioned against falling into the rut of crowd sourcing. “If I had asked my customers what they wanted, they would have told me, ‘A faster horse,’” observed the American industrialist. According to Jay Elliot, Ford’s caution is often quoted by Steve Jobs, founder of Apple. Read the rest of this entry »


Triberr 1.0: invite-only crack for the in crowd

March 24, 2011

The Start-up that didn’t know it was a Start-up

I’m beta-testing an app that could be. Huge. Killer. The stuff VCs line up for! It’s called Triberr.

Once you’re signed up and set up, Tribber automatically promotes new blog posts through the Twitter feeds of everyone in your tribe. Yours too.

My blog reach went from 10,000-ish to 100,000-ish in sixty seconds. Ok, 60 seconds may be an exaggeration. It’s more like 24 hours if you get an invite into the right tribe. In other words, my blog posts are being seen by 10 times more people on Twitter this week than last week. Can you say, WOW, with me? I knew you could… Read the rest of this entry »


Twitter, Facebook, and other web apps as instruments of political and social change

March 14, 2011

The debate over the usefulness of Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube (and many other internet services) is being argued in regard to steering and consummating political and social change at ground zero. The sweeping change in hearts and minds across the Arab world have fueled these debates – especially the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, but also the events in Bahrain, Iran, Jordan, Libya, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, UAE, Yemen, and beyond.

No well informed opinion can deny that humanity’s struggle for freedom and dignity has received more attention now than ever before. The unfolding drama and embrace of change have never captured the imagination and hearts of so many of the world’s population as the recent unprecedented changes in the Arab world.

Never before have so many experienced true revolution directly by picture, video, text message and blog post. Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube (among other social media) made this possible. And let us not forget that it was the English language which was instrumental to the sharing of information, inspiration, insight, sympathy, anguish, hope, and, yes, outrage. Read the rest of this entry »


The Scourge of Inexorable Corruption 1.4

March 11, 2011

You can read the previous post in this multi-post commentary here.

Fight On!

What we all want is a better world. A better life. Isn’t that what we really believe Democracy and Freedom is all about?!

Such democracy is not something we can purchase at a store – online or offline. It’s not a one time, one click purchase. No government can deliver on that. For each of us, it is a life-long commitment to demanding it from each other -demanding the things that matter most. And not just demanding those things – but also giving them. Read the rest of this entry »


The Scourge of Inexorable Corruption 1.2

March 11, 2011

You can read the previous post in this multi-post commentary here.

Complicity

Our world seeks change. And it is ours to drive that change – a change that leaves the world a better place than the world which we received into our servant hands. Change, however, must begin with our refusal to be complicit in wrong-doing.

And that’s no easy thing to do.

In the case of Realitatea-Catavencu v. The Romanian People, the complicity of Romanian journalists and media agencies in downplaying the investigation of fraud and tax evasion is nothing less than a betrayal of the people’s trust in main stream and new media.

The irony is not lost on me when journalists who decry the failure of the Romanian government are complicit in corporate schemes of tax evasion that disable the Romanian economy.

This is not unique to Romania; it happens everywhere for one reason or another.

As Jeff Jarvis, Director of the interactive journalism program at City University of New York, has noted on Twitter and elsewhere, main stream and new media (a la AOL) increasingly conspire with governments, corporations and powerful interest groups. For profit, obviously. Despite the messiness of citizen journalism, Jarvis believes that the truth is out there. Read the rest of this entry »