3 Responses to SOPA, Fukushima, and the Romanian Revolution: Traiasca Revolutia!

  1. incaunipocrit says:

    Reblogged this on Basil Wheel.

  2. My beautiful friend, what follows is a brief review of things I’ve said in the past (some published, some not) and published in its entirety today on my consultancy site. Will it help? IDK. But I do know we are in this together, and together we shall get through it. Such is life. Such is the essence of love. I hope it helps. As a minimum, I hope it gets others thinking, and letting us know what they are thinking. Then I hope it motivates us and encourages us to DO something. Love and hugs.

    There is no question it is a mad, mad world. It always has been. I suppose it always shall. Amidst the madness lies a warm cozy blanket of love. Within the blanket’s warmth a glow permeates the surrounding darkness. That gentle light represents all that is good in this world. What we learn is the darkness has no defense against it. It must submit.

    A Tibetan proverb holds, “Goodness speaks in a whisper, evil shouts.” Madness is like that. It shouts, seeking solace in the company of misery. Because it shouts, it draws our attention, if only for a moment, away from all of the good in our world. To do otherwise is to lose its own life to the glowing goodness that is sure to conquer.

    Plato also spoke to the whisper of good, pointing out “the essential Form of Good is the limit of our inquiries, and can barely be perceived; but, when perceived, we cannot help concluding that it is in every case the source of all that is bright and beautiful — in the visible world giving birth to light and its master, and in the intellectual world dispensing, immediately and with full authority, truth, and reason — and that whosoever would act wisely, either in private or in public, must set this Form of Good before his eyes.”

    Good is everywhere; it has no need to draw attention to itself. We come to realize this soon enough. Why? Because, as Saul Bellow reminds us, “Goodness is achieved … in the company of other men, attended by love.”

    From where I stand, love is the answer. Okay, Oliver Wendell Holmes puts it this way: “Love is the master key that opens the gate of happiness.” I personally like what Martin Luther King, Jr, has to say about the matter: “Love is the only force capable of transforming an enemy [aka, madness] into a friend.” Willa Cather posits, “Where there is great love, there are always miracles.” Can madness hold a light to that? “Who so loves,” we learn from Elizabeth Barrett Browning, “believes the impossible.”

    Lest I get too carried away, let us consider the wise words of Nietzsche: “There is always some madness in love. But there is also always some reason in madness.” Yet, Thomas Mann teaches, “It is love, not reason that is stronger than death.” The late Rabbi Noah Weinberg, a great friend to many, offers a memorable lesson: “There are things worth dying for, and if you don’t understand what you are willing to die for, you haven’t begun living.”

    We live, not because madness wreaks havoc in the world, but because love subdues the madness and unites us as one. We learn this lesson in Dumas’ Three Musketeers. As King Louis appoints D’Artagnan to the Musketeers, he proclaims,

    This world is an uncertain realm, filled with danger. Honor undermined by the pursuit of power, freedom sacrificed when the weak are oppressed by the strong. But there are those who oppose these powerful forces, who dedicate their lives to truth, honor, and freedom.

    As we can see, madness has been with us since before time. So, too, has love! In the end, love wins. Because in the end, we are bigger than the madness and we can see it for what it is. And we can forgive its trespass. “Forgiveness,” as Reinhold Niebuhr so eloquently puts it, “is the final form of love.”

    Leaders, it is important to get this right: We stand one with another not to ward off the madness but, instead, to shower each other with love.

Speak from your heart!

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